Does anyone recongize this boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by BTScow, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. BTScow
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 46
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Madison, WI

    BTScow Junior Member

    I have read the threads pertaining to taking the lines of boats - thoughts ranging from outright larceny and disgust to mild disapproval and the exceptions that fall in-between. I hope, "historical preservation" is one such exception that will mute the land-slide of reprimanding and figure pointing responses.

    This is a boat that is being restored by Brightwork Boat Works in Madison, WI. It was dragged from a shed and no-one seems to have any idea of the designer or builder. I am a N.A. in study and thought it would be a good real life example to study for stability curves and hydrostatics - besides being good looking the information would be useful to the new owner - capacities and all.

    Circ. 1923 -
    21' LOA
    6'7''Beam
    Power: Kermath "make or break"
    Draft - 24''

    I am happy to chase down the smallest of leads. And yes, I know I drew the boat backwards.

    BTScow
     

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  2. duluthboats
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Minneapolis,MN, USA

    duluthboats Senior Dreamer

    William J Deed drew lines similar to this. He was at International Shipbuilding Corp at Nyack, NY in 1923. I would love to see some pictures of the restoration. I think at that time there were many boats of this style. Was there a deck or cabin? In a case like this taking the lines is a good thing. Keep us updated.

    Gary :D
     
  3. mmd
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Bridgewater NS Canada

    mmd Senior Member

    Nice looking boat. Very slack bilges. Any idea how much power in that Kermath?

    As to taking lines, I'll offer my perspective as a (hopefully) ethical professional designer: I have no qualms whatsoever about lifting the lines from an existing boat provided that:

    a.) I have either obtained permission from the designer/owner/builder, or
    b.) have exhausted all avenues open to me to obtain the above and documented my efforts to do so, and
    c.) I am going to use the lines for scholarly study only and do not intend to financially profit from them nor distribute them to others who intend to profit financially from them.

    I find no ethical problems in using the lines from an existing boat as the springboard into a new design "in the essence of", but I give credit to the proginator whenever possible. My most recently built design is based heavily on two 1940's-era Cape Islander boats whose designer/builders have long since passed over the bar. I altered the transom, raised the sheer, and changed the bow profile, but kept the essence of the type. I quite happily call it my design based on a East Ironbound Island type Cape Islander.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    Your use of hand drawn lines, with faint lingerings of erasures, re-lettering, re-drawing and possible smudges, while being an excellent rendering, has me wiping imaginary eraser crumbs off my screen and thinking I need to wash my hands. The horror! This day and age calls for CAD pictures where the whole rat's nest is reduced to 3 or 4 thick, jerky lines without much meaning and no information! What were you thinking?? ;)
    BTW, where would a good instructional be on how to take lines? Sam
     
  5. BTScow
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 46
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    Location: Madison, WI

    BTScow Junior Member

    Sam,
    Well...work in progress with regard to drafting - any number of cliches could work - Rome wasn't built in day - gotta break a few eggs to make an omelet. Seriously, the most painful thing is the time it takes to draw this stuff and then to erase say a buttock line is to kiss 45min - 1hr of time away in about 2 sec - a very strong case for CAD.

    To take the lines I referenced a Wooden Boat Magazine (August 2002, #167 pg. 34-41) article on using laser levels to aid in pulling lines (and yes, a laser level is what you want, I used a DeWalt self leveling laser).

    Also, MMD, it is comforting to hear your rendition of "spring boarding" to your own design as I had my eye on stretching this to 25 - 27ft and not being the scourge of industry. Beautiful Cape Islander - well done. What is the construction.
     
  6. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    I drove from LaCrosse a few times to get resin and materials from the University boatbuilding person. An ornery person, I believe styrene and alcohol combined to produce a jerk.
    Anyway, there are some boats at this site that vaguely resemble what you drew and the place is only a few miles from where you are. It would be a good day trip and probably some wonderfull bars! Sam
    http://www.mainstreetportage.org/Portage Canal.htm
     
  7. mmd
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 378
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 309
    Location: Bridgewater NS Canada

    mmd Senior Member

    The Cape Islander was built of sheathed cedar strip planking on laminated Douglas fir frames and backbone. Trim and transom is Hondouran mahogany. It is powered by a 54-hp Yanmar diesel. The owner has opted to have the optional traditional-shape cuddy built by the original builder over the winter lay-up.
     
  8. BTScow
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 46
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    Location: Madison, WI

    BTScow Junior Member

    mmd,

    I am not sure I understand what sheathes are. Are you talking about a bead and cove cedar consturction with epoxy encapsulated fiberglass with laminated doug fir frames?
     
  9. mmd
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 378
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    Location: Bridgewater NS Canada

    mmd Senior Member

    Oops - mistype. Itshould have read, "sheathed cedar strip planking...", as in cedar strip plank (not bead & cove, beveled for flush fit across the full joint - the builder maintains it takes no longer than milling the edges before hand) sheathed on the exterior suface with fiberglass cloth set in epoxy.
     

  10. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    MMD,
    At first glance your delightful boat looks a bit like a Pusifer Hampton.
     
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