designing a fast rowboat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by nordvindcrew, Oct 13, 2006.

  1. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    self bailer

    I'm not familiar with that type of self bailer. Can you post a picture or the manufacturers name so I can get a look at it. I'm not sure that one would work when we need it. Water is only shipped when it gets very rough and at that point, our speed is down to 3 or 4 knots at best
     
  2. keith66
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Essex UK

    keith66 Senior Member

    Standard self bailers as manufactured by Andersen or Elvstrom are normally reckoned to need around 3 knots to work, the Seasure venturi one is supposed to work slower than that, heres link, not cheap though,http://marinestore.co.uk/SS19-92.html, I would find a dead sailing dinghy & rob it for bits.
    Coastal fours & pairs are fitted with self bailers as standard and i know of several other rowing boats that used them including two guys who rowed the channel in a mondego pair back in 95? got to be worth a try!
     
  3. sailing canoe
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: petaluma

    sailing canoe Junior Member

    Epic's Double Surfski' s now come with two of the Evestrom type bailers. Having paddled one a few weeks ago I can say that they work. But our speed was probably in the 6 to 7 mph most of the time. Most surfskis have full time venturi bailers - so when you stop water comes back in to the foot well. The Evestrom type allow you to close the bailer off giving a flush bottom and shutting off the reverse flow of water.
     
  4. wolle
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: berlin, germany

    wolle Junior Member

    http://www.tsca.net/johngardner/lastchance.htm
    This is realy a nice boat, the 2nd chine curve is peculiar. It doesnt look like especialy good for rough water rowing, but may be my the impression is misleading.

    http://www.guideboat.ca/21ft_guideboat.html#description
    There is more information about the design.


    wo
     
  5. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    last chance

    The reverse chine doesn't seem to be a problem in rough going. The sheer is so low that I thought that would cause trouble, but again, no. Craig Robinson, who rowed Last Chance last fall is an experienced rower and has just come back from a back injury. To get into an unfamiliar boat at the same time as being a bit out of shape is a challange. To row well and win is remarkable. It speaks volumes about both the crew and boat. He did comment that the boat is a bit tender and you need to concentrate to keep her up and going.
     
  6. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    A Win!!!

    after 15 years of trying we finally got a win at the Snow Row. Not the one we wanted, but a first in senior livery double will have to do. we were about in the middle of the entire field of doubles with a time of 47 minutes and change. Not a particularly good time and far off our best of 42 and change. The times are getting faster and faster. a sea ski broke the 30 minute barrier for the first time. singles and doubles are finishing up with some of the coxed 4's and 6's. we started the race in a snow squall and finished in sunshine. temps were in the 40's and the breeze was around 10 knots. good conditions for a race with a big crowd. far more singles and doubles than in previous years and a huge fleet of gigs, afew sliders some kayaks and several sea skis. coffee and a bowl of great chili finished off a good day
     
  7. magnus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: minnetonka minnesota usa

    magnus Junior Member

    Bullet scuppers are available and may be more efficient. Huki (surfskis) sells a pair for $40.00 US, and has directions and other information online. I think they still need close to 3 knots to function and for our application would need a stopper or plug at rest, with their warm water and small foot well I believe they are always open on surfskis. I would consider relocating to the tropics, but it is 72F today in Minnetonka, Minnesota and ice out should easily be 3 weeks ahead of the average of April 13, so I will stay another year. I thought it would be a record early ice out year but 134 years of records showed in 1878 our ice out was March 11.
     
  8. magnus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: minnetonka minnesota usa

    magnus Junior Member

    Concrads on the win and the participation in these events. My last entry was just an attempt to keep things rolling, I did not see your entry until I posted.
     
  9. DickT
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: middlebury, vt

    DickT Junior Member

    SnowRow

    I was just up at the LCMM and got this pic of the gigs
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Walap42
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Minnesota

    Walap42 New Member

    I sort of believe that those who made their living out of the sea had very good designs. Like Safewalrus, I love proven traditonal designs. I have something that closely resembles a New England trapping skiff. The first time I put oar to water I was expecting to need a breather within a few yards. She made headway with the slightest effort. Gigs, trapping Skiffs, and Whale Boats (18th and 19th Century versions) carried a lot of men out and back safely and efficiently. I think those are lines you can live with.

    I grew up in the "Florida Keys" and was known to venture out past the reefs and into the Gulf Stream in a 14' plywood skiff. (I'm smarter than that now). Although, I think I'd do it (60 years later) in a heavier built traditional design with a more modern self-bailing feature built in.
     
  11. coconut
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: United States, Hawaii

    coconut builder of Whitehalls

    whitehall rowing

    I'm the new guy on the block living in Hawaii. Rowing is foreign around here and I'm a novelty in my Legacy 19. Paddeling one, two, and six man outtriggers is the sport of choice. l have a canal in my backyard that is the perfect rowing course. Reletively straight, calm, and leads out to the bay when it's not windy and the surf is down. I've been reading the thread on Wherry's and Whitehalls. For the conditions I have, usually rowing alone, and occassionally in light chop in the ocean, I chose the Legacy 19 with a little higher freeboard. I built it using the lapstrake, glued plywood method described in Thomas Hill's Ultralight Boatbuilding book. An essential reference for the first timer with this technique. My boat has three bench seats, in addition to the bow and stern seats, a small deck at the bow, and the pianteodosi drop in rowing unit with 9'10" oars. It's a little tender and with a squirmy passenger, it can be difficult to row. With the weight kept centered it is a rocketship and a real pleasure to row. It tracks straight requiring only minor adjustments to maintain a course. Before deciding on this design, I considered the CLC Annapolis Tandum, Liz, the Shaw and Tenney Whitehall, Athelas, and the Thames Rowing Skiff. All have great lines, but the Legacy 19 had more of what I wanted. It weighs a little more than 150 pounds. I used 1/4" marine grade ply with West Systems epoxy. Building was so much fun I'm thinking of doing another design. If you guys come to Hawaii, I'm the only rowboat in town. I'm looking forward to learning more about these boats from this forum. Aloha.
     
  12. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - welcome aboard and good luck converting all those unwashed paddlers to rowing!
     
  13. coconut
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    coconut builder of Whitehalls

    Ancient Kayaker,
    I've heard that in the 60's, some of the private high schools had rowing programs. When I arrived in the late 70's, they had been disbanded and all that remained was a couple single's. I took one for a row and when an oarlocks broke, I wound up wading across the Ala Wai Canal. That's the equivelent to backstroking across an outhouse. The outrigger community has a long history and probably won't be abandon by me rowing past. I experienced a Whitehall first (at least for me) just yesterday.............I had my wife in the stern seat while rowing near the mouth of our canal. A small swell picked up the back of the boat and off we went, surfing in a 19' Whitehall. I have to admit it was pretty exciting, but with a "wing span" of nearly 20 feet, not to mention my wife in the back, I wasn't that comfortable. However, with someone as crazy as myself, and a couple of paddles, I may start a whole new sport.
     
  14. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    I think they do something like that in Oz! Sounds like fun.

    I just recently got my own copy of Tom Hill's book - I borrowed a buddy's previously but glued lapstrake is something I want to try. I am slowing working my way through the various construction methods and even a few new ones (I think) that I come up with now and then.

    Just got a kayak back in the water for a paddle yesterday and today, first time for a couple of years (had a bit of health problem for a while) and we've had what we call a hard water problem until recently - not a problem you have in Hawaii I guess . . .
     

  15. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa

    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    outrigger canoes

    You wouldn't believe the number of out rigger canoes that show up at some north easr races. at the blackburn challange there will be 20 or more, and they don't play games--- they're fast!
     
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