designing a fast rowboat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by nordvindcrew, Oct 13, 2006.

  1. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa

    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    update

    Saw Jon at the New Bedford race last Saturday. He posted a time of 34minutes and change over a 3.5 statute mile course. There was a stiff breeze, maybe 10 knots and a nasty 18" chop that was dead on the bow on the longest leg of the race. It was a bit of a challangefor Nordvindcrew, but we managed a 39:33 which was quite pleasing to two old out of shape guys. The Essex slipped right by me this year.
     
  2. Clinton B Chase
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    Location: Saco, ME

    Clinton B Chase Senior Member

    Then you missed another hard breeze and chop on the longest (return) leg!
     
  3. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Now is time to train for next year .... :)
     
  4. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Congratulations.
     
  5. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa

    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    essex

    really dissapointed that I missed the Essex race. I don't know why, but I really like the course, it is very demanding; especially getting out of the river where the current is strong and standing waves really challange you. Also, there is the chance to row with people I don't otherwise get to see.
     
  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Let me design a Kayak for you .... continue to train in those slow skiffs, and you will become a speed demon.

    YMMV.
     
  7. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - but he'll be gong backwards . . .
     
  8. Clinton B Chase
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    Location: Saco, ME

    Clinton B Chase Senior Member

    Rowboats vs. Kayaks

    I've had no problem keeping up in Drake with good kayakers. In certain cases, I could not keep up.

    In my new boat, I'll really have no problems!! :)
     
  9. rowboat70
    Joined: May 2013
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    rowboat70 Junior Member

    The civilizations that took up rowing did much better than the civilizations that stayed with paddling.
     
  10. Leo Lazauskas
    Joined: Jan 2002
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    But best of all are those that took up beercan regattas.
     
  11. nordvindcrew
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Marshfield massachusetts usa

    nordvindcrew Senior Member

    keeping up

    our slow old skiff keeps up with many of the kayaks but the really dedicated paddlers will always beat us. A light boat with 21' LOA and an 18" beam has a tremendous advantage. In New Bedford, we beat three of the whaleboats and all but 1 kayak. RE plans for a kayak: thanks, but I'm addicted to oar on gunnel rowing. Like Clint, We're in the process of hatching a new boat. Nothing scientific, just a stretched version of out 16' Nordvind. The 16 footer is good, an 18' version should be better.
     
  12. DickT
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: middlebury, vt

    DickT Junior Member

    Vertical Chine

    Appears that the way foam core goes on validates the vertical chine concept Ancient kayaker kicked around a while back.
     
  13. keith66
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Essex UK

    keith66 Senior Member

    Verticaly joined core panels make sense as they save an awful lot of glue line as against longitudinal foam strips, hundreds of meters of glue which equals time applying it plus the increased clean up time inside & out. I most definately dont intend her to show vertical chines!
    The same vertical strip idea has been done in steel boats as well notably Reads of haisbro in Norfolk, they are some of the fairest round bilge steel yacht hulls you will ever see.
     
  14. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    The original vertical chine idea came from DickT (post 1217) although I looked at it. I planned to use plywood for a test build but ply's limited bending ability doesn't suit the canoe I wanted. I found about 35 planks would be needed to allow the facets to be sanded off without exposing core veneer, plus ply ribs behind the seams since I didn't want to glass it, and it seemed too complex.

    Foam, on the other hand, should be ideal. It can be smoothed easily to eliminate the facets, so fewer, wider planks can be used ro reduce gluing. excellent notion!
     

  15. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK. I give.

    Why can't you combine the best of both worlds?
     
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