Designing a boat at age 12

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by starling718, Jan 11, 2006.

  1. Tim B
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    Tim B Senior Member

    Well, actually, it is ONLY the mining of bauxite that is damaging. The Icelandic people have been using electricity from geo-thermal sources to convert bauxite to aluminium for some time (almost free and pretty clean). Of course, if it wasn't from Iceland then there might be a problem as the rest of the world thinks that burning fossil fuels is acceptable.

    Anyway, this is on the verge of getting political, so I'll let someone talk about boats now,

    Tim B.
     
  2. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Oh, sorry, Tim B. My mistake, I thought you were suggesting that aluminium boats did little harm to forests.
    Very little Icelandic aluminium available on the market by the way (0000.500) of world's production. Might make a set of spoons for rest of world.
    Or am I being political again....:rolleyes:
     
  3. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Actually aluminium boats can make quite a dent in the tropical forest! Your lumberjack and his mates get into an aliminium boat to get up river with their gasoline chainsaws which not only makes big holes in the forest but also chokes the **** outa whats left! including the loggers (but they are no loss!)!:p

    Or is this also political:?:
     
  4. boltonprofiles
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    boltonprofiles Senior Member

    In fairness to Tim B lads, at least the bauxite mining operations are part of a major rehabilitation environment programme which at least will help towards putting things right after the event. I agree that it is in the first place a destructive mining operation, as any mining is, but it is a world sustainable resource at present levels for the forseeable future (50 yrs or so) and I suppose no matter what materials we use it will affect us in the long term anyway.
    I have used quite a bit of Aluminium in the Construction Industry and some Architects specified it for the ecological advantages.
    I view Aluminium in a different way - mainly recyclability and in moving vehicles less power over weight required to ultimately save on fuels be it on land, air or water.
    For me the recyling element on land for structures may not be of benefit today and immediately apparent, but certainly for years to come in the future.
    Of course a similar argument can be fought for the other materials as well so really I don't think it matters what we use.
    Anyway, just wanted to add my tuppence worth......(that's about 1/4 of a farthing to Bergalia and Walrus)
     
  5. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Gawd Bergalia these children do get wrong don't they? always thought tuppence was half a groat, and as ye know there's 16 farthings in a groat and 1008 in a guinea! That'll f*** 'im :rolleyes:
     
  6. trouty

    trouty Guest

    Indeed - tuppence is actually two pence or two pennys,
    which is one penny short of a thripence, which is half a sixpence, which is half a bob (OK shilling :rolleyes: ), which is half a Florin, which is half a half crown?..which is half a crown which is...half a pound which is.. something of a gold soverign, sheesh, I've confuzzeled me meself now!, and below a penny, was a halfpenny, and below that was a farthing, and below that was a half farthing....

    You know I actually have a 'tuppence' (two penny bit) from I think ~ 1896 somewheres hereaboouts - reckon theres enough copper in it...to make a wire that'd reach from London to new york and back again - tis HUGE and heavey!

    3 of them (sixpence) would be enough to yank your trousers down if placed in a pocket! :D

    Amazing what inflation has done to the coinage of the realm! :(

    So what was a guilder? (oops guinnea?)

    Hmm I was one of those poor sods born in the age of pounds shillings and pence, pounds and ounces (or grains if talking gun powder...or troy ounces & Carrots if talking gold and karrats(sp?) if Talking diamonds) PSI for pressures, pints and english gallons etc etc - and dang me if they didn't change all the rules when I was just 7, (1966) and I had to learn metric!:rolleyes:

    Is it any wonder I grew up confused!

    Cheers!
     
  7. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Trouty you young stripling you, a guilder was something to do with the Nertherlands (the guys who kept chucking ships onto the northern end of the west Australian beach) but a 'guinea' my friend was a strange coin worth 21 shillings or one pound sterling and one shilling as apposed to a 'soverign' which was worth one pound or 20 shillings! so a 'half soverign' was worth ??:p

    As apart from Britains first attempt at metrication the 'florin' worth two shillings or one tenth of a pound!! A 'crown' was supposed to be worth 5 shillings thus a 'half crown' was worth two shillings and sixpence! Cause the old silver 'threepence' was a small coin worth threepence but looked nothing like the newer 'thr'penny bit' which was made of a brass alloy with several (something like twelve springs to mind) sides not unlike the present oz. dollar but smaller of cause!

    aparantally the main reason for changing was that the youngsters under seven (7) had difficulty learning it, it was also a good way to con us out of extra tax! Not only that we could now entice foreigners into the country and remove their cash from their hands - before this they avoided landing as things were a little to complicated for them, the poor little darlings get confused easily!:p
     
  8. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Point is trouty - if metric was really meant to be a valid measurement - how come Jesus chose twelve disciples and not ten.......:confused:
     
  9. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Ah! Bergalia your Wee Free upbringing is showing- there's several answers to that one all of which would bring instant jihad against the teller of such tales (moi!):rolleyes:
     
  10. boltonprofiles
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    boltonprofiles Senior Member

    Hey Walrus - what has half a goat got to do with it - mind you I am just a kid.............
     
  11. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    In 1968 4 of us jumped on a Great Northern freight train in Minneapolis and went to Seattle, it pretty much parrelels Hiway #2. Somewhere in the mountains in the middle of nowhere an Annaconda Aluminum smelter appeared. The whole mountain side downwind of the place was dead. Miles of dead trees. Not burned, just dead from the smoke from the smelter. I would hope those kind of places have cleaned up their act, even so it's hard to imagine scrubbing that much junk out of the process. Maybe that's why Iceland has no trees.:rolleyes: Sam
     
  12. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    So that's why goat tastes so bad to much bauxite in the gravy!
     
  13. Mudnut
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    Mudnut Junior Member

    Hay,Im only new here but lighten up!!!First up TimB is right,ya wont politics theres a place called the BILGE,second up ya really raining on Liz's parade.I dont see too many yougnens ventureing into "supposedly"adult forums with the gusto that her and her friends have,and as far as ya stupid sexual inuendos "Trouty"Not a nice way for a father to exspress himself on such a young person,IS IT,And another thing while Im on it,those man eating lizards ya been waffling on about are KAMODO DRAGONS they only live on one Island in Indonesia,not on the Galapagos Island's,but then again Liz has put ya in ya place once,why do it again!And Liz,if ya still reading this thread sometimes ya have to read between the lines to understand what some adults say to get their meaning.We are not all weired like Trouty and most of us like to come straight to the point.You stick with your dreams,by the way,the young Australian sailor that circumnavigated the world was Jesse Martin,he was only 18,his boat was named Lion-heart and a befitting name it was.Fair winds to ya dream and may ya have full sails.Mudnut
     
  14. Skippy
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    Skippy Senior Member

    Mudnut:
    First up TimB is right,ya wont politics theres a place called the BILGE,second up ya really raining on Liz's parade.
    as far as ya stupid sexual inuendos "Trouty"Not a nice way for a father to exspress himself on such a young person,IS IT
    We are not all weired like Trouty . . .


    I second that. Highjacking a twelve-year-old kid's thread with politics and vulgarity. :rolleyes: :mad:

    Mudnut: . . . the young Australian sailor that circumnavigated the world was Jesse Martin,he was only 18,his boat was named Lion-heart and a befitting name it was.
    "Lionheart" is also the title of the excellent book Jesse wrote about his adventure. There's also a girl from New York named Tania Aebi who made a similar journey around the world at a slightly older age, although hers wasn't nonstop like Jesse's. She wrote a book called "Maiden Voyage" which was also good.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2006

  15. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    And mudnut whilst your on the subject of lightening up try it! Looks like your chucking lead bricks into an already heavy forum buddy!
     
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