Design thoughts on a 9" wooden Sailboat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by JohnBloch, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. frosh
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    frosh Senior Member

    Hi John, I would second the advice given by Byankee. The CMD certainly has a few advantages in my book. Look past the cost, as boating is never going to be an excercise in absolute value for money; it is a lot more emotional than that!
    Apart from the greater refinement in the CMD design it has a better (larger) beam measurement for your purposes.(sailing and motoring) Also it comes with a proper daggerboard case, where the teal looks like it uses leeboards for sailing. The former is much more efficient and less hassle also.
    I would also have to say, would you rather build a Lexus or a Ford Escort? :)
     
  2. JohnBloch
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    JohnBloch Yeah...


    I dont know... I drive a honda civic....... where does that put me at? :p



    yeah... Im basically decided on the bay skiff 12...

    Any suggestions for sails/rigs?

    I kinda decided that 30 minutes to get ready doesnt really kill me... ive got time... and I may even get a different set of sails that could be put up quickly... or just get some oars... haha..

    thanks for all the imput guys...

    and i kinda realized that the outboard thing wouldnt work after looking at the drawing for a little while...

    the transom is most definantly angled way to funny to put any sort of motor on it...
     
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  3. JohnBloch
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    JohnBloch Yeah...

    Do you think a sloop rig would be feasable? I mean, two sails have got to be better than one right? haha...

    Im thinking Id like to stay away from the lateen... even though ive heard they get the best consistant speed...

    how much would it cost to get a set of sloop sails, you know, a main sail with a jib, from most makers? I dont know of any close.. but there have to be some...

    also, if the design doesnt have dimensions for a sloop rig, could you tell me how i should calculate the sizes and shapes?

    thanks... I might have to make a new thread though...
     
  4. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    $200-300 maybe more. Duckworks has decent sails for good prices. Or you could make some polytarp ones.

    Steve
     
  5. JohnBloch
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    JohnBloch Yeah...

    wow.. thats kinda expenso...

    but hey, sails are sails...

    Im not sure if I want to make polytarp sails though...
     
  6. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Maybe you could get some used ones. They might be blown out but still useable, perhaps cut down.
     
  7. frosh
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    frosh Senior Member

    Sails for the bayskiff 12

    Hi John, The sail pictured is a 56sq. ft. sprit sail which allows a fairly short timber or windsurfer mast, either not very expensive. The sail could be made fairly cheaply (compared to a more modern sail). Performance will be reasonable for the hull which is not designed to go at high speed.
    If you want to use a main and jib, contact all the sailmakers by phone and ask if they have any small sails in stock surplus to their needs. If the size is about 55 sq. ft. main and 20 sq. ft. jib this would be ideal. Second hand is another option; doesnt matter from what class of yacht; as long as the size is about the same as above. Note that you will need a second position for the mast step if want to use the jib about 1 ft. behind the original one so that the balance between the daggerboard and sails is maintained. If you use the main and jib all the time then you only need one mast step, the rear one. :)
     
  8. byankee
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    byankee Junior Member

    John -

    Dude! You're obsessed with making things complicated, aren't you ?:D

    There are many benfits to going with the leg o mutton rig specified by the designer - not the least of which is the fact that IT WAS SPECIFIED BY THE DESIGNER who has worked out all of the complexities of the relationship between the center of effort and the center of lateral resistance, the size and position of the dagger board, and a few other critical things that make the difference between a well balanced boat and one that will kill you ( well, that may be a bit extreme...) In any case, if you're going to mess with the rig, you're going to have to either do a lot of research and reading about this stuff before you can make a semi-educated guess about sail size, mast position, etc. or you're going to have to consult a naval architect or someone with a lot of experience. Either way, the result will be a guess - educated, but still a guess - and you won't know if you've got it right until you're actually on the water sailing the thing.

    According to Karl S. the leg o mutton (a.k.a the boomed sprit) rig offers an excellent compromise between the performance of a marconi rig and the simplicity of a sprit rig. That's why he likes it so much. The only drawback is the length of the mast - it won't fit in the boat for transport or storage like a sprit or lug rig would.

    Build the boat as specified. Sail it for a season and then decide if you really need to mess around with it.

    If you feel you really need a sloop rig (more strings to pull, right?) in a small plywood boat, check out the Pooduck Skiff at http://www.woodenboatstore.com/prodinfo.asp?number=400-102
     
  9. JohnBloch
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    JohnBloch Yeah...

    yeah... forget it... haha...
     

  10. Theodora
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Theodora Junior Member

    Why not just build a bigger boat to someone else's design? No need to re-invent the wheel here.
     
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