design feedback

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ieagreg1, Oct 8, 2005.

  1. ieagreg1
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    Location: Kenosha, WI

    ieagreg1 Junior Member

    Hello everyone,
    I was hoping to get feedback on the design of this boat its a 21' barrel stern runabout with a 1920's style bow. It's powered by a 3.0l 135hp I/O it handles well and is quite fast for being underpowered. I designed and built this boat myself it is my first attempt. The one thing I have a problem with is everyone that see's it tells me how great it looks and I'm not sure if theyre just being nice trying not to hurt my feelings. My plans are to possibly build 1 a year as I enjoyed this adventure very much. But dont want to build a dog and end up with a back yard full of these no one wants. Harsh and truthful views are more than welcome.
    Thank you in advance for your opinions
     

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  2. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    cyclops Senior Member

    Why did you put the sterndrive stiffner plate on the outside of the hull. It really is better looking if mounted on the inside. There you can make it as thick or large as you wish. Other wise, it looks great.
     
  3. ieagreg1
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    ieagreg1 Junior Member

    The sterndrive was an after thought. I was going to use a jet drive but changed mid stream. I wanted to get this in the water before the end of the season and this was the fastest alternative. This winter I'll deside on what to do about the power and the transom.
     
  4. KCook
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    KCook Senior Member

    For big waves I would be concerned about the bow getting buried. Should be fine as is for cutting modest chop.

    Does the "barrel back" code really require a circular stern section? I would be tempted to tone that down with slightly flatter sides and top.

    Neat theme for a small custom boat though,
    Kelly Cook
     
  5. cyclops
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    cyclops Senior Member

    I regularly ride this type of hull. The "cleaver bow" as it is known, has a fantastic ability to cut a soft gentle hole right thru a 4' to 5' wave so smoothly that it makes all modern bows into white knuckled monsters. That is why they had such massively strong metal windscreens. My 19' bow rider is airborne on all waves over 2' at more than 40 mph. At 50 mph I grab the top of the windshield with both hands, lower my head and close my eyes till I land. I never feel the need to do that in a cleaver bow because it never flies in the air.
     
  6. cyclops
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    cyclops Senior Member

    I agree with KCOOK on the round stern. Too severely round. Look at more barrel backs. Or stay as is. It is your design.
     
  7. Gilbert
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Cathlamet, WA

    Gilbert Senior Member

    Hi,
    I bet just about everyone wishes their first design turned out so nice. I think the outdrive detracts from it's classy appearance. It would better fit the average persons expectations if it had a conventional inboard. You might try tampering a little with the round section of the barrelback as others have noted. But my only real criticism is that you need to put a new net on your basketball hoop.
    Good job.
    Gilbert
     
  8. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    In regards to the barrel back, I like the amount of tumblehome on the sides. I would tone down the curvature of the aft deck. Having a smooth transition from highly curved sides to standard deck curvature would look ideal. Or you could just do away with the whole afterdeck like this little gem.

    http://www.svensons.com/boat/?p=HydroPlanes/Flyer

    Personally, I view wooden boat construction as an artform and as such, as long as you combine good looks with structural durability and safety, anything goes. Wood and varnish (and epoxy) are the medium. Throw in a little technology and you've got a living, breathing sculpture.

    Curious though, did you do a constant dead-rise hull and spray chines or did you go with a traditional planing afterbody? What kind of wood did you use for the deck? Epoxy construction?

    Since you are looking for criticism, while I like the light wood on the deck, there is almost too much contrast between it and the kingplank and covering boards. A darker deck or lighter kingplank and covering boards would make the contrast a little less stark. This is only my opinion and I am by no means an expert. I'm contemplating a similar deck on the runabout that I'm building.

    It looks like you did a great job. I'll be anxious to see it when trimed out. I little more chrome, maybe?
     
  9. ieagreg1
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    ieagreg1 Junior Member

    learpilot,
    The hull is based off of a riviera although knowing what I know now I would have gone with more of a deep v. The hull is mahogany framed with 1/2 ply and the sides are 1/4 ply then 3 alternating layers of mat and weave fiberglass then the sides are planked with 3/16' hoduras mahogany the bottom is bare fiberglass as well as the covering boards. The mahogany on the deck is 1 x 2 clear mahogany you can buy from menards. It work out nice no ripping just trim the ends to fit. I agree with everyones sugestions of toning down the aft deck this is a battle I must fight with my girl friend as she likes it the way it is and so far hasnt given in. And yes there is going to be alot of chrome rubrail, step plates, windshield brackets, ect.
     
  10. Raggi_Thor
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Raggi_Thor Nav.arch/Designer/Builder

    Maybe the chine could be a little higher in the front?
     
  11. cyclops
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    cyclops Senior Member

    A happy woman behind the wheel is a "good thing". Can you afford to do another boat with the changes? Lay off all the fiberglass. Glue, wood, stain and varnish do the same and are better for a all wood boat.
     
  12. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I agree with cyclops. I happy woman behind the wheel is a good thing. :p
     
  13. KCook
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    KCook Senior Member

    My thinking as well. I still worry about burying that chisel bow. How are the sea trials going?

    Kelly
     
  14. cyclops
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    cyclops Senior Member

    Burying a bow on a vertical bow is no life or boat threatening deal. The wave is split apart, not pounded apart like a modern runabout. You have to drive one to understand that.
     

  15. ieagreg1
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    Location: Kenosha, WI

    ieagreg1 Junior Member

    The sea trials went well but short due to a bearing failure in the cobra sterndrive but when it was running it was fine steady and smooth, it leaned into the turns nicely but the bow was a bit to high will probably need trim tabs to bring it down. It will also be very ruff in chop with the relativly flat bottom. This boat will spend most of its time on lake michigan where pounding thru the waves is not advised unless your running something like a 40' plus cigerette. The waves here can easily reach 3 foot (great for jet skiing). The sterndrive is fixed and will run it again this weekend with any luck.
     
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