Definition of Full load deperature or arrival condition

Discussion in 'Stability' started by kiddo14, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. kiddo14
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    kiddo14 Junior Member

    Hello Everybody!!
    I was curious about the definition of the term "FULL LOAD CONDITION". In Intact stability code 2008 for cargo ship/Oil tanker it is recommended to consider the following loadcase: "ship in the fully loaded departure condition, with cargo homogeneously distributed throughout all cargo spaces and with full stores and fuel" and others.
    My question is here by saying full they mean how full the cargo tank should be?
    Because I have seen somebody consider cargo tank(oil cargo) as 98% full, Some 95% full. Is there anything specific?
    I do have an initial guess about the term. I don't know it's correct or not. I think maybe by saying full they meant whatever maximum the percentage may be but they must be homogeneously distributed and do not cross the summer loadline or bending moment. Am I correct here?
     
  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Full load means fully loaded with tanks filled to 100%. But when the tanks are completely filled, the correction for free surface is zero, so it is normal to take a fully loaded with cargo tanks at 98% or 97%, which changes little in desplacement compared to 100%, but allows consider correction by free surfaces. On the other hand, filling the cargo tanks 100%, is not convenient. So we can also say that the full load is only 97% tanks.
     
  3. kiddo14
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    kiddo14 Junior Member

    Thanks for your reply. As far as I know no oil tanks are 100% filled because they leave space for oil expansion. But my question is I did not find any specific document where the definition of the word "Full" is given. I have seen stability booklet where in full load condition 85% of the tanks were full. So I am curious to know is there anything specific written about it. How much of the tank should be full when I say full load condition.
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    As I said earlier, maybe I have explained wrong, I put in the "full load departure" condition, tanks filled 98% or 97% (all other consumables 100%), or said in another way, the maximum value for which the correction for free surfaces is noticeable.
     
  5. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Need to check to what standard the boat is designed. In IMO IS Code conditions and ISO Small Craft 12217 standard the definitions of conditions are not the same.
     
  6. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    ISO for small crafts does not speak about full load departure.
     
  7. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    The have full load and arrival conditions, in 2013 version.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

  9. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    For mLDC before they took 100% of liquids, now is 95%.
     
  10. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I see, thanks a lot. Anyway, I do not know if OP's question has something to do with the small craft which are governed by the ISO.
     
  11. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    You also need to look at the vessels specification. Generally the 'Full Load' condition is described in the technical specification. Since it dictates many design features as well as liquidated damages for the performance of the vessel.
     
  12. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    It would be good to remember that the issue raised by kiddo14 is this :
    In this context, the vessel's technical specification has nothing to say.
    It is of course possible that the owner wants to raise certain load conditions or additional stability studies before and after damage, or many other things. But, in my opinion, that is not the question of this thread.
     
  13. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    For tanks and flooded voids the permeability I use is 95%. This complies with Transport Canada stability regs (essentially IMO). The 5% allows for internal structure such as framing, stiffeners, baffles, etc
     
  14. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Interesting discussion : I think the concept of full tank we are discussing here is slightly different to the concept of permeability that is used in studies of floodable length or stability after damage.
    A curiosity: There are special cases, for example, some tanks are constructed so that no reinforcements inside, to allow better cleaning. What do you think here it's a full tank ?.
    The permeability to be applied to each space is well defined by the IMO code.
     

  15. e.m.milad
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    e.m.milad Junior Member

    You will not find any ISO or IMO reference for commercial ships to know what is really Full load DEP. or ARR. mean, by the way for consumable tanks (such as fuel oil tanks) you can use 97- 100 percent and all classification societies will approve such terms. for cargo holds ( like tankers or Bulk carriers ) you can have a lot of loading conditions for example 50% full departure and arrival , 60% departure and arrival , and so on depend on your owner request or port regulation.
     
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