Deck texture repair?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Nick.K, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. Nick.K
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 327
    Likes: 21, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 103
    Location: Ireland

    Nick.K Senior Member

    I have been tasked with a deck repair to a small racing keel boat which has minor collision damage on the side. The deck has a heavy moulded non-slip texture which resembles wood chip wallpaper. I'm at a loss as to how to replicate this in the repair area. The only idea that occurs is to take a rubber mould off another area, complete the repair with a faired gelcoat surface and then attempt to mold the texture on top with the rubber.
    Does anyone here have an alternative method?
    Thanks
    Nick.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 471, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, the latex mold technique works, though specific patterns are hard to match up, but random patterns work pretty good. Can you post an image?
     
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  3. Nick.K
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 327
    Likes: 21, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 103
    Location: Ireland

    Nick.K Senior Member

    Thanks Paul
    It's a random pattern, I don't have a photo but I'll take one on Monday. I was concerned with the mould method that it would be difficult to get it to look fair. I've no problem with this with a fairing board but moulding something on top feels like losing control...
    How's this method worked for you? Any bonding issues with the texture?
     

  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 471, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've pulled sections of decking, tapered the seams after the deed was done just to find the same issue you have. How to treat the repaired seams or missing sections of the old textured areas. After many different approaches, I like thew latex method for a small, quick fix. It also always seems on my projects I have to deal with a waterway or two (or a dozen). This is where careful selection of a pattern area, with a waterway edge or corner comes to play. I generally tape off the area I want to cast in latex, matching up waterways, curves, edges, etc., then butter up the space with latex. The first coat goes down thin and as uniform as practical. I do several coats, avoiding bubbles (blow on it) and thick spots. Now the cured mold can be used alone and I do this on small jobs, but if you need to make more than one casting or don't want to play with a floppy mold, just use some polyester resin and mat (3/4" - 1 once is fine). With this mold, you have the texture you need, but you'll have to cast it in place over the deck. I grind the deck down in the repaired area for good tooth, as it'll bond better to laminate not gelcoat and either I make a "patch" or use the mold directly on the deck. A patch has some advantages, as you end up with a small section of deck (or whatever) that can be easily cast facing up and trimmed as necessary to fit the repair area. The first time you do this, you'll have to work the learning curve a bit, but it is something you'll easily get your head around.
     
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