Deck Replacement without Dropping Mast?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by brokebosun, Dec 21, 2021.

  1. brokebosun
    Joined: Dec 2021
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Slidell, LA

    brokebosun New Member

    I'm about halfway through a major restoration of a Cape Dory 30. Unfortunately, the deck is severely rotten in several areas, and I'd say about 60% of it needs to be re-cored.

    I am wondering if the mast should be dropped for this job or not. The deck step and cabin top are in good shape, so deck work won't be done near the mast itself. However, I am concerned about the loading from shrouds/stays/mast as I remove what little strength the deck has left. Perhaps I am overthinking this, but I imagine that the deck experiences loading from the fully tensioned stays/mast and compromising the deck during re-coring could damage the skin that is not removed during the job.

    Could the stays be de-tensioned enough to keep the mast in place (in calm weather) but reduce forces experienced by the deck? Is this even a concern at all? It seems most people do this job on land with the mast dropped but unfortunately that is currently not an option.

    Thanks
     
  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 1,313
    Likes: 322, Points: 83
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Your thinking correctly.
    Pull the mast.
    If 60% is shot the remaining 40% can't be far behind.
     
  3. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,589
    Likes: 125, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    As you say detension the shrouds and do one part at once, that is if the mast is keel stepped. You can add some additional "shrouds" to concrete blocks sitting on the ground. Deck stepped would be too flimsy.. The biggest concern is how to keep everything dry if not indoors or desert.
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 5,851
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    I'm not a sailor. I understand the basics of a sailboat. In order for anyone to answer you, I'd say you'd at least need to show the repair areas on a drawing. Otherwise, noone is really going to advocate for repairs on the water.
     

  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,768
    Likes: 1,195, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If you are doing a major restoration, removing the mast is a must. It is a really easy operation. A old boat that has not been maintained will most likely have rigging issues too.
     
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