cutting back on dock line rope wear

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by sdowney717, Jul 25, 2015.

  1. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Typically I braid a loop in 3/4" 3 strand rope to make a dock line.
    Throw a line around the piling and slip end of rope thru the loop.
    This works ok for many years, but eventually the boat pulling against the line, the rope wears on the loop.

    I was thinking why have a loop at all?
    How about wrapping the line around and around the piling.
    Secure the line end under the first wrap around the pole.
    This way the rope wont wear against the loop in the line.
    And the line wont ride down the pole, which sometimes it does.

    If I did this, how many revolutions round the piling, 4? to hold well?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A common method is to have a chain loop around the piling.
     
  3. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    That's an interesting idea. I have not seen it yet.
    So it works as an anchor connection having a braided on thimble on the end of the rope?

    I do have lots of rather large long chains that were used to secure loads on trucks and for hauling logs out of woods.
    They are very beefy, not galvanized, so rather rusty. I could use those I suppose. I must have over 100 feet of chain.
    The chain is bigger than 3/8, it might be 1/2 or 7/16, I will have to measure the size of those links.

    It is only one bow piling line that seems to wear, due to the prevailing winds tend to push the boat that way.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Yes, that is it. The chain will take a lot more chafe than the line.
     
  5. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    You can nail a small piece of 2x4 to keep the line from slipping. I had a smaller boat, but I would just use a bowline with an extra round turn to reduce chaffing, and also to keep the bowline from slipping past the 2x4. I've also seen garden hose used. I like the chain idea.
     
  6. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I was just thinkin a little, keep the loop, then just wrap my line around the pole one time. that way it wont be always pulling on the loop and wearing the line there so much. It is the constant pull, let go , pull action movement that frays the line at the loop.
     
  7. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Yes. Make a big loop with a bowline and then use a double piling hitch with the loop if you can reach over the top of the piling. If not, trace the same pattern as the double piling hitch, or something similar, and then tie the bowline after. This works best if you can leave your docking lines on the piling. A hook that you can hang them on helps with their retrieval. Some marinas may not allow this for fear of lines fouling props.

    An alternative is some sort of a hitch with a thicker rope that stays on the piling and has a ring or thimble on to tie your thinner docking lines to. The thicker rope, properly hitched, should wear less, and the thinner berthing lines, well sprung, can provide some spring, and be doubled up for storms.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    What I did on the forward bow pilings was to simply wrap one more turn around the pole, and that seems to be holding tight with no future rubbing possible in that spot which was worn. Line is 3/4 3 plait nylon, I suppose I might someday cut it and splice the ends together. I untied the boat and pulled boat over to examine it and that rope is pretty worn down in that spot.
    I think it has lost half it's strength, so not good for a hurricane wind, but ok otherwise. It is the only line I have worn that way.
     
  9. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Sounds good.
     

  10. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I liked your diagram of tying to a piling. I think it uses more line than what I have right now, but saves the trouble of braiding the loop.
     
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