Cruise Ship Design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ShinySides, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I think there will be a direct relationship between the area allotted per passenger and the level of luxury or ticket class. For example, if you fly economy there is barely any leg room, but in first class they provide a cocoon.
     
  2. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    When I went to primary school in Gourock, Renfrewshire, a bob was a shilling, or 12 pence, so 20 bobs to the pound, 100 bob would be 5 quid.

    Anyway...

    So 3500 passengers means a Purser's Department of 1000-1800. And that's before the deck and black gangs, so lets say a lowball total complement of 5000. Setting the route at the typical 7 days with a max underway of 2 days then we get the following at military outfitting levels.
    Dry stores: 134,400 lbs; 5647 cf
    Freeze:46,620 lbs; 1707 cf
    Chill: 69,300 lbs; 3413 cf
    General stores: 81,060 lbs; 6755 cf
    Fresh water: 650 LT, 1,456,000 lbs, 23,400 cf
    Black water: 192 LT, 430,000 lbs, 6720 cf
    Grey water: 279 LT, 624,960 lbs, 10,044 cf
    Crew/berths and effects: 495,000 lbs, 460,800 cf
    Passenger/berths and effects (min); 1,400,000 lbs, 1,400,000 cf
    Galley space (2 sittings); 17408 cf
    Crew messing; 12,000 sf, 96,000 cf
    Pass messing + lounge; 42,000 sf, 336,000 cf (assumes 2 sittings and pre/post lounge utilization of 50%)
     
  3. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Mine was just a mathematical consequence of:
    hence the conclusion:
    :D :D :p

    But anyways, thanks for explanation. It seems that people have no clear idea about how much a bob is worth. Poor animals are definitely underestimated. :p
     
  4. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    I figured it was money, looked it up and two bobs is two shillings, although shillings are a mystery also. I don't think it's much, not near as much as two bits, I reckon.
     
  5. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    Certainly less than 2 quid Sam Sam.

    (Sam Sam looking up again)

    Poida
     
  6. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Lol !!! :d :d :d
     
  7. NavalSArtichoke
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    NavalSArtichoke Senior Member

    Then there's Bob's your uncle.
     
  8. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Ratios and areas for dining is the easy part. This is a queuing model study. The trick part is determining the number of servers that is required for a given constraint (time) and the number of customers.

    The servers can be defined in two parts, one that serves food and the other, the dining table. The system implies that is a two server model and can have two or more distinct character. One is forced, that is the customer has no choice but to enter the system no matter how inconvenient it is because they have to (eat) given a time constraint. The second form is that customer can have a choice. Balking when the system is full and the choice is either to wait and do something else if given the luxury of time or refuse to enter the system (eat). Time consideration is a must as the system is operational only at a given set of time per day. The system has to shut down in between (cleaning, maintenance, rest).

    I made this spreadsheet as part of application because I took up Scientific Management course. It is as applied to a floating labor camp (converted ship) to house and feed a 3,500 labor working in 3 shifts. The model predicts how many servers are needed given the time constraint. This is a forced system model as the customer has no choice and the only luxury they have is they can wait until the system slacks. It can be adjusted for first class passengers who like to be pampered by a multitude of servers and the luxury of staying long in the table while eating.

    Once the parameters are established, the area needed and the traffic flow will come naturally. It will take some time to digest (no pun intended) the terminology explained in the sheet but rest assured this model was written by known authors T. Cook and R. Russel, from the reference book Management Science.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. ShinySides
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    ShinySides Junior Member

    Can I ask how these are calculated?
     
  10. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Food, stores and effects comes from NSTM-096 Weight & Stability.
    Purser dept manning estimate comes from general industry practice.
    Crew berthing is based on a 12x12 4 man compartment; passengers a 12x12 double.
    Messing is 4x4 per person per sitting, which may be high for crew and tight for passengers.
    Potable water is based on survival minimums of 5 gal/day/per for 7 days.
    Black water on holding 5 gal per person per day (i.e. 4 flushes) for 48 hours; grey water is a function of normal water consumption ~15 gal/day (+ 5 gal for drinking/cooking).
    Galley space is based on 1 cook station per 50 persons.

    I assumed a 8 foot deck spacing
     
  11. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  12. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  13. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Dining Saloon-based on the numbers eating at one sitting. (Area, Volume, Dimensione ship design)

    1st Class 1.5m2 for large numbers, 2.3 m2 for small
    2nd class 1.3m2 for large, 1.6 m2 for small
    Lounges- 2m2-100% for tourist, +100% for 1st Class

    Chair & Table Spacing Tips & Suggestions (Restaurant design)

    14 sq. ft per person for spacious dining (allows for table, chair, and aisle)
    12 sq. ft per person for caferteria or restaurant style seating
    10 sq. ft per person for banquet, institutional, or close seating

    Square Tables
    Table Size/Number of Seats
    24 X 24
    2
    30 X 30
    2-4
    36 X 36
    4
    42 X 42
    8
    Rectangular Tables
    Table Size/Number of Seats
    24 X 30
    2
    24 X 42
    4
    24 X 48
    4
    30 X 42
    4
    30 X 48
    4
     

  14. mcarling
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    mcarling Junior Member

    Now that is an interesting idea. The largest cruise ship classes now have two superstructures, each with a beam of about 24m, one to starboard and one to port, separated by an open promenade, and joined in a few places at the highest decks. See the Oasis class for the latest examples. The promenade separating these two parallel superstructures is about 15-16m wide. This arrangement allows for "balcony staterooms" which face inward over the central promenade, allowing the cruise line to sell more "balcony staterooms" and fewer windowless "interior staterooms".

    It seems to me that the next logical step in the continuing progression of ever larger cruise ships might be to approximately double the width of the central promenade and make the ship a catamaran. That should (unless I'm confused about something) improve both stability and efficiency. Since slamming would be unacceptable, I would expect the under deck clearance might be 8 to 10 meters. On the lower decks, windowless "interior staterooms" would be replaced by "oceanview staterooms" with portholes providing a view of the waves between the hulls.

    So two hulls each with a beam of 24m connected by a promenade (and other connections as needed) of 32m would be an overall beam of about 80m. I imagine length would be in the 300 to 400m range, similar to current larger cruise ships.

    Is this idea completely wacky? Is there something that ShinySides and I have overlooked? Or is this likely to be realized in the 2020s?
     
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