Creating a swing out forward window from teak

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by sdowney717, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I salvaged a lot of 1" thick deck teak from a 1968 Egg Harbor.
    Decided to use it for a window frame.
    It is rabiited on the bottom so as to fit into the existing rabitted opening.
    5/16 thick teak strips frame the glass. and overlap the edge by 1". Underneath that will be low density black foam weatherstrip 1/2 wide by 1/4 height.

    It will be hinged at the top. Under the hinge will be a rubber strip from a bike tire.
    1/4 inch tempered glass with radiused corners will go into the frame.

    I always wanted a forward opening window.
    I have to come up with a prop support design to hold it open. My idea is push it from the bottom. Would be nice to have it open all the way. The dash area on the boat is large, about 18 inches deep in front of the window.
    My idea, a 4 foot long wood rod attached to center of lower frame. And it could be slid along to adjust the window opening position. Window frame is 39" wide and 32" tall, so the prop rod needs to be long to push it open.

    Anyone have a fancy idea to prop open this window? Which would allow for more than a few inches of opening?
    In front of the window is a mast. I have thought tie a line with a cleat to hold it open instead of a prop rod.

    Album
    https://goo.gl/photos/hULcFYnvU5rX1UmB6
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

  3. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Thanks, the second link is interesting, it seems to function like a step ladder.
    It may be too much weight-leverage to use that.

    There is another cheaper device called a casement adjuster.
    http://kilianhardware.com/casadbyphel.html
    Meant to to prop up windows.

    My idea which won't cost anything is attach this ring, on left of pic, to the bottom of the teak frame.
    Then bend a piece of 1/4 inch copper tubing around it secured to a wood rod and use this to prop it open. It will be loose enough to slide around on the ring.

    I have though of crafting a wood slider parallel with the teak frame to push this rod starting at an angle which will force the window open.


    Anyone know what the device is on the right side, cable on a mast? And what was the ring used for?
     

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  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The rings are used on spars to keep the lines from snagging. Sometimes they are used on deck too. The other seems like part of a tang that was cut.
     
  5. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Glass is glued into the teak frame. I used Loctite Black PL which is similar to 5200 or Sikaflex to secure the glass. I have done several windows using Black PL and it has been working to keep a good water seal.

    Got the priming done on the outside facing frame.


    Showing the small teak corners I shaped and epoxied to allow the glass to fit the frame.
    One advantage, these corners make the frame a little stronger. The frame is doweled together with two 5/16 SS sections of threaded rod, so it was plenty solid anyway.

    The glass shop made it with the wrong radius twice, then seemed to lose interest in me as a customer. So they gave me the wrong glass having 2 inch radius for free. I had to modify my frame to fit the glass. And it took forever to get the glass.

    I am not a glass person, so my paper I made showed having a 2 1/8 inch diameter, which they continually assumed as a 2 1/8 inch radius. Even giving them a full size pattern was no help.
    But I got this for zero cost and they fixed a porthole mirror for free too.

    This glass actually is a better match to the windows to right and left on the corner radius.
     

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  6. sdowney717
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I forgot to share the Black PL coated frame.
    I smeared on a layer with a 3 inch putty knife.
    Then I lightly sanded and filled in to smooth the surface with Zinsser 123 primer using same putty knife. Then a couple sandings and paintings of primer with a brush.
    And sanded smoother where glass meets Black PL, then primered and filled with Dap ALex + caulk, primered again. So it has a nice look where teak frame meets the glass.

    Using the putty knife works well to spread primer as a filler.
     

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  7. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Mostly finished the swing out window. It does not leak from the rain.
    I used 2 loops of low density foam to seal the window one next to the other which loop around in a u shape the edge of the window. under the hinge, I used a piece cut from a bike inner tube.
    The wiper motor will fit in the window and move with the window.
     

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  8. JFH
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    JFH Junior Member

    Check out an old Grew Cruiser or Cruiser configuration for a windshield. They invented this stuff. I have a set of hinges and a windscreen like this too. My boat has the Grew Cruiser sliding and locking mechanism and it works very well for venting the boat when running or at a stand still.
     
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