Cracked hull/accident please help

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by CaptainReza, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. CaptainReza
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    Thanks a million PAR and watchkeeper!

    I checked this morning and it was rock hard!!

    PAR, what do you mean by if it looks seamless, can you please explain this to me? What looks seamless? After grinding, the area was not level, some areas, I had gone deeper and some areas I took out less because it seemed it didn't need more removal...

    I am learning so much here and it makes me so happy to have found this forum that words can't describe! All of you who have helped me are true Gentleman! Thank you for not being annoyed by my lack of knowledge and skills!
     
  2. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    I learned a lot and will continue learning from you guys and me tackling these jobs on this waverunner.

    In airplanes, rule for a solid repair is feathering 20 times the thickness removed in the main load direction and 10 times in the transverse direction...

    So if this was a repair on an airplane, and for the sake of example, I went in about .3", I had to scarf 6" on each side for the laminate to have the strength of an undamaged laminate...
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    For the most part, the scarf or feather portions of this repair, are not structural considerations and only provide sufficient surface area for a good bond and transition from old to new laminate. If it was a structural repair, then yes, you'd want to pay closer attention to the transition areas and also the replacement materials. You're just applying some makeup to a pimple.
     
  4. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    LOL...Awesome!
    Realistically, how many hours the finish and repair of a damage like this take a pro and what would be someone's bill? Just out of curiosity...

    I just can't imagine the repair takes more than an hour for a pro who knows what's he doing... refinish, I do not know...
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It takes a surprising amount of time, unless you employ some short cuts, such as those I've mentioned. Fairing takes the most amount of time, but again, if you have experience, you don't have to do things two and three times, to get it smooth and ready to paint. That's the real difference between a pro and a novice. We'll fair it once and prep for paint, while the novice plays with it several times filling pin holes, nicks and missed spots.
     
  6. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    The actual time for a pro must be only minutes... each process takes almost no time. Of course, time elapsed between starting and finishing can be hours. Epoxy must cure, primer and paint must dry. Things must be located, measured and mixed too.
    Amateurs usually spend enormous amounts of time simply getting organized, most of driving to and from the store.
    Take your time getting together all the items you need. Tape off and cover all the surrounding area. Have a solvent and rags ready to clean epoxy off of tools and surfaces. Though yours is a very simple job, it still requires forthought so that you can relax and do an unrushed job.
     
  7. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    PAR and Alan

    You couldn't be more right!
    Alan
    you hit the nail on the head...my story!

    I laid only one piece of glass over last night repair...
    After this I will do the filling....
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If this was in my yard, It would take three - four hours of work, but you wouldn't take delivery for 3 days. The first day I'd spend the first hour grinding out the spots, then the next filling with material. This would then sit for a day to cure, next would be knocking it down and applying fairing compound. It would sit for several hours then get faired. Once faired and sealed, it would sit some more then get painted, which would be the last hour of effort. You can only go so fast, waiting for things to cure, which is why it would take three days. Depending on how anal you are about a paint match, the cost would be in the $400 - $600 range, including materials. If you wanted a dead nuts paint match, you could expect the costs to double. The color would be very close, feathered into surrounding areas and blended as best as practical. Under certain lighting conditions you might see a slight difference in reflectivity, gloss and possably the shade, but it would be slight. This is because it's black and the most difficult color to match, except the metal flakes. If it was a dead nuts match, you wouldn't notice a thing, except in the wallet.
     
  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Stickers are good to cover up small non matching repairs. Or lines boot stripes what ever --even a STP sticker, chinese dragons etc
     
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  10. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    As much as I tried I couldn't fill with one shot...I will sand tomorrow and fill again...the top part of damaged area didn't have feathering like the sides and I couldn't fill it all the way...anytime I put the squeegee to it, it took away some of the goo...btw,I had the goo thick but I guess if the gap is large and there's no proper feathering its hard to fill...am I correct?
    Please help me here....
     
  11. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    Love the sticker idea and I'd be l lying if I said I didn't have that in mind but I really want to learn from you awesome gentlemen and this is the perfect project for it so when I get to that stage I'd appreciate your help and guidance....at this point I just want to experience and learn....its such an awesome feeling when you tackle something you've never done before and with help and guidance you accomplish something....
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  13. CaptainReza
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    CaptainReza Junior Member

    So I checked this morning and its a mess!
    I should've kept building it with cloth as I have more control over that until the gap is minimal...Lots of sanding on my way lol and filling again..

    And the masking tape I had is now one piece with the hull lol

    Poor job :( Hope to be able to fix it...
     
  14. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Take heart, CaptainReza, for this is all part of the learning process and you will succeed. Later on you will share what you have learned with others who will be in your present predicament. :)
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    On your next go around with wet goo, take a piece of Mylar, big enough to cover the wet spot and place it over the wet goo. Very lightly press it into the goo with a roller, then tape the top edge so it can't slide down the side of the hull. As Alan pointed out, the difference between the pros and the back yard guys, is the number of times we do things.
     
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