Coronado15 Rebuild

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by 5monkeys, Dec 31, 2015.

  1. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Those splash boards don't do much, and you can fix their fit very easily. Last weekend I was out in 25 knots of breeze, and the waves were the biggest I've ever seen sailing this boat. Not a drop of water came over the bow. We reached across Sarasota bay and then back because that's about all we could survive. The wind and the waves were right into our side. If we were punching into those waves, we might have taken some water over the deck, but I don't remember ever seeing those boards do anything to shed water. The original teak is nice, but it's not necessary. Mine hangs on the wall like a sculpture. :)

    [​IMG]

    The mast partner is necessary. I built this one, and a replacement hatch. They are much lighter than the originals.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    So I emptied a little over a gallon of water out of the de-humidifier last night, I hooked it back up just to see how much more I can pull... I figure it can't hurt. In the mean time while I had it off, I snapped a couple of pic's of the deck there to show the cracks.

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    The cracks might only be gel-coat deep. The wooden mast partner does a good job of distributing the clamping force of the bolts and all the forces that the mast will introduce. The weakest link, as far as I could tell, is the bottom side of that flat section. This part of the hull is cored.

    On my boat, the underside glass layer (inside the boat) was resin starved (lot's of little spaces between the fibers of the glass cloth.) When the boat was upside down, I saturated the area with new epoxy. When I re-tightened the bolts, I just snugged them up. Over torquing here can sort of crush the core. You might consider drilling a few shallow holes into the core near some of the factory bolt holes; this way you can check if water has saturated the core. But, It's not exactly "mission critical" to the goal of getting it out for a sail this spring. You can revisit this issue at anytime in the future. Bigger washers, or some sort of backing plate, on these five bolts, is probably a good idea

    Just a couple thoughts, you'll want to remove that old silicone sealant (I never re-caulked the new lumber and I've been happy with that choice,) and if you pull out that Styrofoam, air flow will improve and the hull will dry out more evenly.
     
  4. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    The dehumidifier is a really good idea. Is it still pulling out water?
     
  5. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    Hi Canracer,
    #4 monkey and I got some good work done on the boat this weekend. We picked up our marine grade plywood, so that's on hand. We disconnected the dehumidifier after pulling about 2.5 gallons out of the boat..

    I actually got up there and stuck my head and shoulders below.. and funny enough.. from behind the bulkhead, I found...

    [​IMG]

    There's only one though, so no free sailing shoes came with this boat. I started to tug and pull on the foam, I could get it to wiggle but it wouldn't come out... I managed to break off about a 12 inch section only to find that it had been hollowed out pretty good by something making a home ..YUK!


    [​IMG]


    It didn't take long before the foam was out of my reach, it was time to send in #4monkey.

    [​IMG]

    It turns out the more we pulled out the more nests/homes we found... thank goodness the "squatters" appear to have moved out since we didn't find any. But there's still a lot of foam we didn't get to so there maybe some graves back in there still. Anyhow... I didn't keep that nasty foam... I guess I'll be shopping for something else... maybe klegecel although it seems like something sprayed would be easier to put in.
    [​IMG]

    #4Monkey did a great job with the shop vac and in the end we posed for a quick selfie...

    [​IMG]

    We called it quits after that and the temps have dropped to the teens so we haven't been doing much... There is still some moisture in there that the foam was hanging on to so it's not a bad idea to hook that dehumidifier back up. I did put together the puzzle(templates) for the bulkheads. They didn't come out as mirror images so I think I'll cut out some cardboard or foam core replica's to test fit before cutting my pricey marine grade lumber.

    I didn't see photo's where you actually used the bulkhead template? What's the little triangle.. where does that go, the forward chain plate?



    View attachment 105268

    [ATTAhttp://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=105272&stc=1&d=1453243088CH]105269[/ATTACH]

    IMG_0138.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

    1 person likes this.
  6. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Awesome pictures, and the boat is looking perfect. I see that the compression post is gone (did it fall right out?) There is lots that can be done with the hull at this point.

    If you sight along the bottom of the hull (about where the Styrofoam used to be,) do you see a depression? Depending on storage conditions over the years, the weight from snow cover, rain fall, and or accumulated stuff, will make extra pressure at the trailer bunks. Eventually the hull will start to take the shape of the bunks. Now is a great time to fix that (if it's an issue.)

    I think you can get the rest of that flotation removed with some type of hook. When it comes time to add flotation back, people do different things like adding empty milk jugs (the route I took,) soda bottles, purpose made air bags, and cheap pool noodles (worth considering.) Spray in foam is like boat kryptonite for many reasons, steer clear.

    Again, everything looks fantastic. I'll tell you more about those bulkhead templates at some point; I used them and test fitted them, and then picked a slightly different strategy. Don't start cutting up that expensive plywood just yet. Lots of stories to tell.
     
  7. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    The compression post and the plywood gusset (or whatever that pathetic rotted triangle that fills the space between the trunk and the compression post was called) came out without much fight..as did the little fin that had been sticking up about a foot along the inside of the keel... all of that is gone. Only a little bit of cleanup is required in those area's... I was thinking about making the compression post extend back to the cb trunk instead of having that separate gusset piece in there.
     
  8. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I was thinking the same thing about the shape of the new compression post. Do you see that 4 inch wide strip that's glassed to the center of the hull? It's about 4 or 5 feet long. The compression post used to sit on top.

    That thing is old plywood and it's probably soggy and at least 30 percent mush. Here it is.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  9. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    yeah, fiberglass and paint.. etc. is flaky on there, I need to clean it up to see how mushy the wood actually is.
     
  10. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    The templates are over sized. I still have them kicking around with the test bulkheads (cardboard and cheap ply.)
    20160120_112708.jpg
     
  11. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    I drilled some shallow holes and all the shavings came up dark and damp. I don't remember it being difficult to remove; some of it pulled out easy and in some places (along the edge radius) it had to be cut free (shallow cuts with a grinding wheel.) Maybe it wasn't necessary to remove the entire thing, but it's the foundation of the new post. A new piece could easily be built and installed with the new ply; I laid down solid glass.

    The boat here is upside down on saw horses. This shows the hull after that original center strip of plywood was removed. That flat section under the old strip is wood colored but it's solid thickened polyester resin (or something much tougher.) I did some sanding of the solid pieces of glass that stood up (what remained of the edge radius) but I didn't worry about it being perfect before it was built back up with solid 10 ounce glass.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    When temps were low, these work lamps really helped out (on each side of the shop vac.) They are 500 watt halogens from Harbor Freight, but they go on sale at every big box store. They were soooo cheap. Could be helpful for drying out a hull and curing epoxy. They burn a little to warm to enclose inside the hull, one or two regular 100 watt bulbs are good for that. Just set them on a piece of scrap wood so they don't touch the fiberglass.

    Here, they are drying new paint.
    [​IMG]

    Add some type of blanket and it keeps the heat in (this is an old carpet.)
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Just a note, when the hull is upside down like this, it makes reaching some parts of the inside of the hull easier (because of the way the body hinges.) I sat on that milk crate and got all sorts of work done.
     
  14. 5monkeys
    Joined: Oct 2015
    Posts: 163
    Likes: 2, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Herndon,VA

    5monkeys Senior Member

    Do you flip that thing around by yourself? It weigh's a bit more than I can toss around by myself.
     

  15. Canracer
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 621
    Likes: 9, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 47
    Location: Florida

    Canracer Senior Member

    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. revintage
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    99
  2. tuna_fan
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    243
  3. Mcdo2137
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    1,078
  4. Derek cord
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,010
  5. Russell Walters
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    930
  6. chowdan
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    863
  7. Rohde.Soda
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,356
  8. andysailor
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    652
  9. Matt Duval
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    600
  10. Chris Warren
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    2,140
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.