Cooler and Fish Boxes What to Paint Inside With

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Rebel01, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. Rebel01
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 46
    Location: Greece

    Rebel01 Junior Member

    I've got a couple of questions that are more along the lines of food/ fish safety, than actual boat design. I've constructed some storage compartments that can double at fish boxes and a cooler seat in my Boston Whaler project boat. I replaced the floor, stringers and transom, now I am paint prepping.

    On factory rigs, coolers and fish boxes seem to be lined with gelcoat. I was wondering if I were to use epoxy or polyurethane paint, if it would have any effect on the food inside. Some coating are not what you would consider food safe, so I am curious if anyone knows if there is any off-gassing or metallic particles in the paints that would be potentially dangerous.

    I want to spray the boat and I am not really setup to spray gel. If I am required to use gelcoat in these areas, I will probably just go with a roll and tip method.

    Any input or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Dan
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 3,577
    Likes: 510, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Two ways.

    Tint epoxy blue and epoxy coat.

    Or buy a blue two part epoxy paint.

    The straight epoxy has no uv protection and will probably chalk overtime, but might save you some $.

    Gelcoat is probably also fine, but much harder to apply in a handformed livewell or cooler.

    Everyone suggests blue keeps the bait calmer.

    As for the use of the epoxy; I can't imagine it to be a problem after fully curing or post curing.
     
  3. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 994
    Likes: 207, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Gelcoat hes a longer off gassing time than either epoxy or polyurethane. Paint off gassing should stop within 30 days of ventilation. Easy test is to seel up for 48 hours then sniff. No smell no more off gassing.

    I'm more concerned if using waterborne polyurethane and have adhesion failure caused by water in bait tank
     
  4. Rebel01
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 46
    Location: Greece

    Rebel01 Junior Member

    I may not have explained my self well in the OP. I'm looking to coat the inside of my cooler (food and beverage storage) and kill tanks for fish, not my livewell. Basically, I'm looking at using the boat for several extended camping trips per year (when not fishing) and would like to be able to hold ice for food and drinks. I'm concerned about food safety and paints. I know gelcoat is safe, but is more difficult to apply for the coating I want. I'm not set up to spray gel. My gun will handle epoxy paint and I have it on hand, just want to be sure it is safe for food applications.
     
  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 3,577
    Likes: 510, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    There are food safe epoxies if you want to go that far.

    Personally, I think fully cured epoxy would gas off less than many plastics-just an opinion with no basis in fact other than my good nose.

    Just google it-food safe epoxy.

    Minnows, however, are very susceptible to toxins and livewells are often made with conventional tinted epoxies or two part paints.

    For the amount of time your food would be in the cooler; I wouldn't worry.

    Offgassing and chemical changes are more likely to occur in ovens, in general.
     
  6. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 994
    Likes: 207, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Quoting Fallguy

    Don't worry

    Unless you find a historical can of leaded oil based paint, no toxins will persist in the fully cured paint film. Some modern paints/coatings may contain aluminum oxides, but most authorities believe it to be nontoxic. Titanium ,taulk and gypsum are also considered safe for food contact or storage.

    Toxic volitals are abundant in all coatings. They will outgas quickly. 99.9999% gone in first few hours. The slowest to clear is gelcoat followed by oil based paint. Because of the thinnest of coating, catalyzed urathanes are the quickest to finish outgassing. Leave the holds open for awhile after paint is dry. I have been overwhelmed by fumes after opening cabinets that were kept closed for months after painting. So inital ventilation is paramount.
     
    BrissoDamo and fallguy like this.
  7. Rebel01
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 46
    Location: Greece

    Rebel01 Junior Member

    I've got basically everything at my disposal. I went ahead and did the cooler with gelcoat to see how it would go with a brush. Not bad at all, but could use a second coat.

    The gelcoat is topcoat so I probably need to sand quite a bit if another coat is needed. I've got the initial ventilation going on, as the cooler doesn't have a top yet--still making it.
     
  8. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 994
    Likes: 207, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Must say I'm surprised you went with gelcoat.
    Brushed\rolled gelcoat easily hides sanding scratch. I would use 80 or 120 grit. Fast and efficient

    Good luck
     
    BrissoDamo likes this.

  9. Rebel01
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 46
    Location: Greece

    Rebel01 Junior Member

    That was exactly why I went with gelcoat in the cooler, as I have quite a bit and needed to fill some small imperfections in the glasswork. I was thinking to fare it, but the gelcoat easily took care of my cosmetic blemishes.
     
    BrissoDamo likes this.
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. 95Sailfish176
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    684
  2. BoneCollector
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    530
  3. FV Genesis
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    803
  4. stubrowner
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,428
  5. npeteyd
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    2,357
  6. makobuilders
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    5,984
  7. jbeboatman
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    2,003
  8. mehsjohnson
    Replies:
    62
    Views:
    16,579
  9. eagle19
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    2,906
  10. joaquim
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,468
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.