Constant Beep

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by Amir, Jan 8, 2021.

  1. Amir
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 6
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    Location: Australia

    Amir Junior Member

    Hi All.

    I have a 60hp mercury outboard which has a universal throttle lever.
    I started it last week with no issues. However today once I turned the key to ON position, a constant beep started. Having said that it's 2 stroke motor and no oil tank on it. It had before but the guy I bought that from said it is now pre-mixed oil and fuel so there is no oil pump.

    The water comes out from the pee hole is also not hot so I believe it's not an over-heat alarm.
    Could anybody please advice what to do even how to disconnect the sounder from the source.

    Your advice is much appreciated.

    Regards,
    Amir
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If it isn't the oil alarm, it could be the overheat alarm has shorted somewhere. If you can temporarily disconnect that, it might tell you.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    You do NOT want to perm disconnect the alarms. Those will save your engine if the impeller fails.

    Disconnect one sensor at a time to see if it stops. Replace each connection if the sound continues.

    1.engine temp
    2.Oil level
    3.Oil pump

    if the alarm sounds after those three the module might be bad

    if it does it on start; not after running awhile, the sensors have failed or might be dirty

    ps-no oil pump, make sure to determine what they did to the oil pump sensor, please report back to the forum what happens
     
  4. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    If it happens when you first turn the key to the on position, it's not overheating, but it can still be the sensor. Not uncommon.

    If it's been converted to pre-mix, its still possible for the old sensor to set off the alarm if it's still there, or if a wire came loose.

    Like FG said, disconnect each alarm one at a time and turn the key on.

    The year of the motor and trim level comes into play to diagnose the alarms constant or intermittent beeps.

    Also, the temperature of the pee stream on many motors does not indicate whether the motor is over heating or not. The flow may only indicate if the water pump is working. The water exits through the pee hole prior to going through water jacket on many designs.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Of course the old rule applies, if you are going to tinker with old outboards, a good workshop manual is essential, where wiring diagrams and troubleshooting schedules trump guesswork, Monday to Sunday inclusive. If inclined to baulk at shelling out a few dollars for one, then a new hobby is needed.
     
    fallguy likes this.
  6. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    My Admiral would suggest a new hearing aid battery first!
     
  7. Amir
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Australia

    Amir Junior Member

    Thank you all for your valuable advise. I could not work out what the issue is. I turned on the motor last week with no alarm. That's why I thought Mr efficiency was correct and it was shortened somewhere. I checked the manual and found the wiring for alarms. It goes into the main power socket so I couldn't disconnect that.

    I took the boat to have the first test in the water. What happened was the alarm started going on and off.

    But, when I started the motor, it was working in a neutral position. Once I put that in gear and increased the throttle, it started bogging and died. It happened every time I started the engine.
    (running rough and shaking in idle & died after increasing the throttle)

    So I'm not sure if I need to replace the gear shifter lever on not. (for both reasons; the constant beep & dying in full throttle).

    Thank you all again.
     
  8. Amir
    Joined: Dec 2020
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Australia

    Amir Junior Member

    There are plenty of wires loose in the motor which I believe they belong to the old oil tank.

    However, there is a tube at the bottom of the cowl which is blocked with a screw and I think it was the old sensor place.
     
  9. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    From your description it appears you don't have a working knowledge of how outboards function.

    Stop running it, get a shop manual and read it, then go through the checklist.

    Yes you can test each alarm circuit individually, but you need to understand how it works first.
     
  10. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 1,407
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Amir,

    The "Constant Beeping" is called an "alarm".
    It's going for a reason.
    Ignore or disconnect it at your peril.

    The engine ran fine, no alarm.
    But now, the alarm sounds on start-up.
    Shut it off immediately and figure out
    why it's sounding.

    Good luck!

    BB
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Now you are talking about more than the beep. One thing at a time is best, the heat sensor should be in the cylinder head area, there should be a wire coming out of it, and it should be able to be disconnected at a socket nearby. If you manage to (temporarily) disconnect that, and it still beeps, then the problem isn't in that sensor. But the manual should be telling you how to isolate what the problem is.
     

  12. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    An unplugged sensor wire on a normally open circuit won't matter unless it is shorted closed. You cannot allow loose wire terminals in the engine. If they contact each other even via a common metal; they may sound the alarm. Also, if they taped the wire terminals to each other off the sensor; same result; constant bell.

    Sounds like you have a boogered up engine. A service manual might help you a LOT.
     
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