Condensation in the cabin

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Dr. Peter, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - or a lightbulb for an incubator.
     
  2. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Electric heat is also 100% efficient.

    90 watt heaters with a small fan are available and are designed to run full-time. They offer an good solution. I believe they go by the name "Turbo Dryer" and are about $75US.

    -Tom
     
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  3. Dr. Peter
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Zeerust, Victoria, Australia

    Dr. Peter Junior Member

    12 volt electric heaters vs candles

    OK,
    This is interesting. The forum is suggesting candles put out x watts and that only a little heat is required to make a substantial difference.

    My boat, the boat with the problem which began the thread, is an 18ft 6" fibreglass trailer sailer with no lining. It has a pop top. We noted ventilation plus a candle 'helped' a lot but not in those unventilated areas like the foot end of the quarter berths.

    What I do have, thanks to the previous owner, is a gel battery and a solar panel. The switch gear and wiring is updated. All it does is run lights and charge my phone.

    I reckon there is capacity for a small 12 volt heater. I am conscious we are not trying to 'heat' the cabin as such but reduce condensation. Even a couple of degrees above ambient could help. It also makes the cabin warmer (at least less chilly).

    So has anyone any experience with this?

    Peter

    PS I would like to apologise about my earlier coarse remarks about the posters getting into tangents about spell checkers. My comments were thoughtless, rude and uncalled for.
     
  4. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    DR. Peter even a small electric heater could deplete a battery fairley fast, you might be better to install a couple of 12 volt computer fans to move the heavy damp air from those trapped areas. They draw next to nothing. In winter storage I build what is labelled a Humidex unit. A 6in. plastic pipe with a computer fan installed within,one end in the bilge and the other exausting to the outside. It does an excellent job, my boat is fresh as can be in the spring.--Geo.
     
  5. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    All this can be done passively with sunshine and convection currents.

    -Tom
     
  6. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Bellingham WA

    cthippo Senior Member

    They make solar powered fans that are built into hatches and are totally self contained. It wouldn't be a ton of air movement, but it would be fairly constant
     
  7. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    It takes very little power to keep humidity from building up, just enough to raise the temperature of the air a degree or so and to keep it moving. However these low power devices are not going to take care of existing moisture so any significant accumulations should be removed by other means.
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Dr. Peter: Sorry for the thread drift.

    You are half way there. You are now understanding the principles of reducing condensation: Ventilation, heat and dehumidification or controlled condensation.

    You must simply apply these principles to every area of your boat that you feel is getting too damp. That is, literally, all there is to it.

    Being a trailer sailer, you are not going to be able to do any decent heating. You also do not have the power to run an electric dehumidifier (or heater). That leaves you with ventilation as your only choice.

    Ventilation, as mentioned, can be accomplished through forced air (fan) or convection (carefully planned sunlight, which won't work at night).

    The small, solar self contained muffin fans that Cthippo mentions are probably your best bet.
     

  9. Dr. Peter
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Zeerust, Victoria, Australia

    Dr. Peter Junior Member

    Looks like a project

    Thanks for the input everyone.
    Looks like its now time to do some cutting and drilling.
    Peter
     
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