Compsite question

Discussion in 'Materials' started by greg334, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. greg334
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Michigan

    greg334 New Member

    This is not a boat related question but a composite related question.

    I drive a cargo van for FedEx Custom Critical and have a plywood interior for my bunk and cargo area, most is 1/2" plywood. The use of plywood adds about an estimated 800 lbs to the van. I am trying to reduce the weight but maintain the layout.

    I have been told that the material I need to use is Nida Core H8PP material sandwiched between fiberglass because the composite is really strong but very light.

    For example in the bunk area I have a 32” X 60” ¾” piece of plywood for the bed to sit on which supports around 250lbs, either equipment me or both. I store stuff underneath the bed but have to go through the cargo area to get to because this piece is pretty much stationary and weighs (if I remember correctly) close to 40lbs. If I can replace this with a lot lighter piece, I can move it when I need to get to the stuff under the bed.

    I wrote to the company that makes this stuff for advice and see if I can get a sample (maybe 6” X6” sample) to see what the material is like but have yet to receive a reply.

    I am wondering if I am on the right track to reduce the weight and welcome any advice for a solution to this problem.

    Oh can someone tell me where I can get a couple samples of H8PP material.

    Thanks in Advance

    Greg
     
  2. SeaSpark
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Holland

    SeaSpark -

    marine ply sandwich panels

    I surely think you are on the right way reducing weight.

    It may be interesting for you to buy of the shelf marine ply sandwich panels. I do not know about a relieable supplier in the US so consider this link just as an example of the material.

    Look for "MarineCell PVC Core" and "BalsaMarine Composite Panels" further down the page.

    http://www.worldpanel.com/Marineplywoodsspecialty.htm

    The best of luck with your project.
     
  3. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Prefab panels like this are available; they're geared towards the boat and aircraft industries. Aluminum, balsa, Nidacore and Nomex honeycombs are common, with aluminum, fibreglass or Kevlar skins. I think you're on a good track here with this idea as the sandwich panels will not only save weight but will also be rot-proof and more resistant to spills etc than the wood.
    You will almost certainly be able to find panels that suit your needs with a bit of judicious Google searching. Or you can make your own, flat panels are pretty easy to do.
     
  4. JR-Shine
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Vero Beach, FL

    JR-Shine SHINE

    We use and sell the 3/4" laminated Nida-core panels. I used them in my flats boat sole in place of plywood. the 3/4" will have about the same deflection as a 1/2" sheet of marine plywood. The thing to be careful of is how the edges of the panels are supported. The edge is the weak spot, so you need to either fill it with thickened resin or glue in a piece of wood. We have send them to guys building horse trailers and I know they are used for the sides of delivery trucks.

    Joel
     
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  5. greg334
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Michigan

    greg334 New Member

    Thanks for all the info.

    Joel - wondering if you could provide a comparison of the weight of the laminated Nida-core to plywood?

    Also the idea has struck me to use the stuff for a cargo body on a cutaway chassis. I heard that Westernstar trucks use the stuff but they are trying to figure that one out when I paid a visit with them this morning - they are less than a mile away. I am wondering what thickness is used for the delivery trucks if you can tell me.

    Thanks

    Greg
     

  6. JR-Shine
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 341
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 54
    Location: Vero Beach, FL

    JR-Shine SHINE

    This might help....

    http://boatbuildercentral.com/proddetail.php?prod=NIDA_H8PP_finished

    The difference in weight will be more dramatic the thicker the honeycomb. For instance if 3/4" honeycomb panel is half the weight of 1/2" plywood with the same stiffens - a 1.5" honeycomb panel will be maybe a third the weight of 1" plywood. Your only increasing the thickness of the plastic honeycomb which weighs very little- the glass skins are the same. At some point you need more glass.

    Hope that helps.

    Joel
     
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