Completely New to Boat Building - Want to build my own boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Sven Sin Darko, Jun 22, 2015.

  1. Sven Sin Darko
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: canada

    Sven Sin Darko New Member

    Hey Boatdesign.net, I'm 24 and I have always wanted to own a boat.

    I however, cannot afford to go out and buy a boat because I am a student and The type of boat I want isn't really in my price range. So after a few weeks of stern research, I've come up with a general sense of what I want.

    I have a few questions before I can get started, and thats why I'm here, So Humbly I request some feedback from all the experts at BoatDesign.net!

    • I'm looking to build a boat , 16-18 feet in length, 8-9 feet wide.
    • The boat will primarily be used for fishing and the occasional cruise for fun
    • I want to build the boat in my garage (I have access to all the tools i would need from my grandpa)
    • If possible, I want the boat to double as a sail boat/motor boat. I don't need high speeds out of either, so the sail height and set up doesn't need to be complex or large scale.
    • The boat will only be used on lakes ( in ontario )
    • I don't plan taking the boat far out into the great lakes where the water is very turbulent ( but i do want the boat to be sturdy enough that I'm comfortable )
    • Looking to seat up to 4 people comfortably on benches along the sides of the boat, with a sort of figure head on the front end instead of a seating area

    I can't think of anything else to say about that but im sure i've missed some things.


    Plan on using regular plywood to stack up and bend using the glueing method with those vice things to create the hull. Seal it up with epoxy and paint it.

    Is this build impossible? im looking to make this over the next year of two, no rush long term project.
     
  2. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Sven,
    Thank you for your interest in boats and boatbuilding. It is always refreshing to me to see this elemental passion. Boats have a lot to offer, in their conception, their design, their construction and care, their function, and in their memories. There are many good ways to build boats, and many good ways to design and to use boats. Your idea of a figurehead is interesting. When I redecked my fibreglass kayak with a wooden deck I put one of these on the front...

    It is a carrancas from Brazil...
    [​IMG]

    Yeah they make thousands of them for tourists, but mine was special to me because it was a gift to me from my family down there. I hope you enjoy building your boat with your grandfathers tools. It does help if you already know how to sail, or how to row, or how to fish, but even if you do not, life is for learning. I hope your grandpa is still with you and your are able to spend time with him in building this boat. If not, I know you will take good care of his tools, and think of him as you work with them. Humbly, here are my answers to your questions...

    •I'm looking to build a boat , 16-18 feet in length, 8-9 feet wide.
    That is wide for a boat that long, like a cape cod catboat. It is actually quite big for a first project, but small enough to fit in your garage which might be your intention. My only real comment would be that you might want to either buy or build a smaller boat while you are building this one.


    •The boat will primarily be used for fishing and the occasional cruise for fun
    Got it. What kind of fishing? Do you fish now?

    •I want to build the boat in my garage (I have access to all the tools i would need from my grandpa)
    Make sure you have room to work around the boat. If you start with something smaller you will learn a lot and have something to use while you are building the big one.

    •If possible, I want the boat to double as a sail boat/motor boat. I don't need high speeds out of either, so the sail height and set up doesn't need to be complex or large scale.
    Would you also be interesting in rowing it?

    •The boat will only be used on lakes ( in ontario )
    Which lakes? I picture Lake Huron and Georgia Bay for some reason. Not sure why. I lived in Niagara-On-The-Lake when I was I was four. We had a small daysailer. Good memories.

    •I don't plan taking the boat far out into the great lakes where the water is very turbulent ( but i do want the boat to be sturdy enough that I'm comfortable )
    That is reasonable. If you build something that big it may as well be seaworthy. How heavy do you want the boat to be. Trailerable I take it?

    •Looking to seat up to 4 people comfortably on benches along the sides of the boat, with a sort of figure head on the front end instead of a seating area
    Interesting.

    Here are some ideas...

    The Scamp is very popular now and has a good support network...
    http://smallcraftadvisor.com/message-board2/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=63

    I saw this the other day and rather like it...
    http://www.cmdboats.com/catbird16_yawl.htm?cart_id=6179b5645d2b1ed12a20f560ea2a17ba

    Here is something in the size you mentioned...
    http://www.mcssl.com/store/hhpaysoncompany/instant-boat-plans/chebacco

    You could modify them to have smaller rigs if you wanted them primarily for motoring. Normally they would not be so wide if used primarily under power. I wonder if a St.Pierre Dory might interest you. They can be sailed, rowed, or have an outboard mounted in a well. They can also have a small cabin but don't need to. Normally they are 26 feet, but you could build a smaller one. Here are a range of banks dories, built in the classic sense. The Trawl or Fishmaker might be the size you have in mind, but a bit too long for a garage. The Fishmaker shows an outboard motor well. You can fit those onto smaller dories also.

    http://doryshop.com/dories/

    Here is a St.Pierre style dory, design to be home built. You could adapt the plans so that it could be built in a garage, but again I think the real challenge is to have space to work around it, unless you have a two car garage, and no cars. ;-)

    http://www.mcssl.com/store/hhpaysoncompany/catalog/product/eefaebf40273d1b66a315e324544d22b
    [​IMG]

    Get busy. ;-)
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If you are on a tight budget, a used boat is a cheaper option. In North America boat depreciate very fast. Can you post a photo of a boat similar to what you want?
     
  4. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Looks like you go some good advice there Sven. Dories are a great way to get a seaworthy, easy to build fishing boat, and you might be able to pick one up cheaper than a build, even if you have to do a bit of restoration.

    I mention another design to move the conversation along

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Highlanders.htm
     

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  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    A new build is going to cost a lot more then just fixing a used boat in need of some love.

    18' boats are literally a dime a dozen and with some wise searching and an experience person along for the rid, you can pick up perfectly serviceable boats, that just need a new battery, fresh fuel and the carbs cleaned. Simply put, don't kid yourself into thinking you can build new for less.
     
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