companionway hatch opening definition and some other

Discussion in 'Class Societies' started by expedition, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Panama

    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    I'm going through the MCA LY2 code and it talks about a companionway hatch. (5.2.2)

    I have not been able to find out what exactly that is ! Can somebody enlighten this non-native speaker?

    Also, if MCA requires a coaming height of 600 mm, is it permitted to accomplish this with a removable coaming plate, possible in combination with a sensor that shows on the bridge that the coaming is removed?

    And when does a portlight become a window? Is it a question of size or shape or both?

    Thanks for your feedback.

    Thorwald Westmaas
     
  2. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    expedition,

    It must be a translation problem mate, I am sure you know what they are, it is just the English language.

    The companionway is the section of a boat the leads either upstairs or downstairs, it can be covered or open, but when it is covered, it is covered with a hatch (door). Now when they talk about a coaming, it is a physical barrier, attached Permanently around the hatch opening, in the specific case you are asking about , it is assumed the opening is in a decking area as the coming height is 600mm, and no it cannot be removable. When you go below from the deck, through the companionway hatch, the coaming is designed to stop water from flowing down the hatch when the hatch is opened, the hatch (and) cover would be attached to the top of the coaming.

    The other question, a portlight is a window in the topsides or hull superstructure /structure, often opening but always with glass and deadlight (solid hinged cover plate). It is also called a scuttle in some languages. A window , on the other hand would not have this arrangement, it could be found in a wheel house as the front screen or as side windows in superstructure that is above the usual water/wave slash zone.

    Hope this is understandable for you my friend.
     
  3. Dutch Peter
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Dutch Peter Senior Member

    Just to add, the 600 mm coaming height comes from the International Load Line Convention. Any nation is, to a certain extend, free to make there own interpretation/exemption on this and a vessel can be allowed a removable sill in some circumstances.

    Generally speaking, a portlight/scuttle is round or oval and the size is limited to about 500-600 mm diameter.
     
  4. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Panama

    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    Thanks both of you. I'll check with the flag state requirements (Panama) if they allow any solution that would allow us to navigate with removable coaming.

    Thorwald
     

  5. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    Panamanian registration allows whatever you are prepared to pay for!
     
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