Cold moulding over old planked boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Richard Williams, May 24, 2018.

  1. Richard Williams
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: South Coast UK

    Richard Williams New Member

    I am considering buying this 1974 37' Italian boat. The boat has been in the same ownership for 14 years and has in that time sailed over 16K miles. The current owner has undertaken major work on the hull as he says the planks were wet. He is not a native English speaker. The work looks very impressive and the finish excellent. It was carried out by a very well known Italian yard who specialise in this type of boat.

    Is this a good repair? Should I worry about any residual moisture in the planking causing problems in the future? Forum members help would be much appreciated
     

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    This is a time honored method to breath new life, into a tied old hull. The moisture content of the original planking typically is permitted to drop to acceptable levels, depending on the adhesive used to bond the veneers. Additionally, the original structure needs to be in good shape or repaired, so it can accept the additional weight and strains the new, thicker planking will impose.
     
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  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It looks like a well done job.
     
  4. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    After restoration, would this boat float higher because of added volume and need more ballast to float on it's designed lines?
     
  5. Richard Williams
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: South Coast UK

    Richard Williams New Member

    Absolutely right she does sit a little higher in the water. Luckily the decks and gunwales were also completely replaced at the same time so water ingress into exposed ply edges is less likely.
     
  6. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Nice restoration indeed. Glad to see old wooden boats getting a 2nd lease on life. That one has classic racing lines and will be a joy to sail.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The additional volume doesn't amount to much, particularly when the weight of the veneers and glue are added up. What does happen is, the water weight gain that previously pulled her down, goes away and this is the likely cause for the slightly higher LWL. Typically the hull shell would be allowed to dry below 15% moisture content, which is fairly easy to do in a well covered area, which this appears to be. My 37' carvel power cruiser lost nearly two tons when I made revisions to her planking schedule, as she dried out.
     
  8. Richard Williams
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: South Coast UK

    Richard Williams New Member

    Just for completeness I have been informed that the wood strips where 8mm Mahogany not ply! Sounds reassuringly expensive
    and just as good?
     

  9. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I have a 1960 Carver cold molded runabout with mahogany veneers; 10 bottom and 5 on the sides. Not a single rot spot that I am aware of in the veneers. One minor area of rot was found in solid mahogany stem/keel. And one area of rot in the transom at bilge seam (plywood) during the last 15 years. Knock on wood no issues with the veneers in 58 years. This Carver was bagged upside down on a mould though; not sure how they got the planking to lay down on this sailboat. Copper or bronze staples?

    Also, the Carver does not allow ingress from above and the hull is sealed pretty well at the bilge/keelson. Not sure what they did there or what the standard is...maybe someone wiser can say.

    It would also make sense to know what adhesives were used; some would be far better than others. It goes without saying the expectations are for good materials the way things look.

    Survey?
     
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