Clyde built boats of Detroit Michigan

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Hosey/ethel, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Hey to all,

    I live in Iowa and am currently trying my first restoration of a mid-1950 Clyde 16' runabout. It is hard to find any information about Clyde boatworks and their products, and I was wondering if anyone knew where I might look.

    I am a true rookie and have greatly enjoyed reading all the posts, ideas and information on this site. Thanks to all.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I did some repairs on a Clyde, which sounds just like your boat. I had no luck finding information about them on line or through my usual sources, other then being out of Michigan. They seemed to use good materials and workmanship, though used a less then conventional planking method (in this country anyway). They're lightly constructed and the hull shape does pound noticeably in a chop. If yours still has the built up transom you should consider a plywood core/hardwood inner and outer skin, which will simulate the original exactly, but stabilize it and keep it from leaking. Other issues are the rubs and plugged limbers aft, preventing draining the boat through it's transom, which rots out the aft portions of the inner layer of planking. Because they're lightly built, the deck can crack easily, the hull can be breached easily and rot doesn't have to eat much before it's a major problem. Post some picture so we can compare notes.
     
  3. jbowers417
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Ohio

    jbowers417 Junior Member

    sending pictures

    I would love to. However every suggestion I've received on how to do this has failed.
    Salty

    Moderator note added after the fact on 9/24/2007: See the Attachment FAQ for how to post pictures. Be sure your popup blocker is not blocking the new attachment window. If you still encounter issues send me a pm and I'll do my best to help.
     
  4. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Thank You Par

    Thank you Par for your response. It is just awesome to hear somebody talk about my boat. I am in the process of replacing the transom and your info will help much. I think it can be just a beautiful boat...we'll see. I will post some pictures as soon as I figure out how. I truly am a rookie and this was my first post. Am anxious for any and all advice on this project. I have to rebuild all decking and framing for the deck. I plan to use plywood, any suggestions.

    Thanks again.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Keep it light. These little boats do fly if kept lightly built.

    The deck is 1/4" mahogany plywood over closely spaced stringers of oak. In fact the whole boat is mahogany over oak, with structural elements being oak and the skin being mahogany. The dash is solid stock as are the filler blocks below the side decks (both mahogany), but most everything else should be oak. The two bilge stringers may be southern yellow or Douglas fur.
    Most transoms of this era were "built up" usually double planked of oak or other hardwood. They rack, leak and don't hold up with the modern HP most folks hang on them. You'll want a plywood core inside that transom for long life and no leaks.

    Post some photos so we can see if it's the same model or send them through email.
     
  6. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Thanks for the info. It helps a ton. I will work on getting those pictures up in the next couple days. I would greatly enjoy your input during this journey. So far I've enjoyed every minute of it.
     
  7. smirnoff
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Lake St Clair

    smirnoff New Member

    Clyde Boat Works - Detroit

    My grandfather lived right down the street from the factory in Detroit at 8600 Livernois Avenue, I was at the factory as a very young boy, but honestly do not remember the visit. My grandfather actually purchased a 14' boat in 1955, the cost was $295.00, the boat weighed 190 lbs, I still have the boat but its far beyond repair!

    The company started building boats in 1925 & they claimed to have built over 10,000 boats. When I was younger (1960's), many Clyde boats, mostly small runabouts, were seen on Lake St Clair (where I currently live). They also sold Evinrude outboards at the plant, along with other boating items (oars, paint, rope, water skis, anchors, etc).

    Clyde Boat Company's fame was: 5 Ply Moulded Marine Aircraft Birch, that was light as a Canoe, but with the Strength of Steel!

    One last note; all the boats had to picked-up at the factory, they did not ship......

    I hope this information was helpful - the plant is long gone.....:mad:
     
  8. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Great Info

    Hi Smirnoff,

    What great info. I have been on Lake St. Clair. I am from Hale Michigan originally, which is near Tawas. My dad is on old wood working teacher and loves wooden boats. He had the boat I am restoring given to him about 15 years ago, and has wanted to see it in the water. I picked it up from Michigan about 4 weeks ago and have just begun restoring. I knew they were built in Detroit, but little else about them. It is a boat that has some personality to it.

    Thanks for the response. I enjoy learning all I can about Clyde boats. I know they had a logo on their boats, and I'm searching for that also.

    Take care and thanks again.
     
  9. smirnoff
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Lake St Clair

    smirnoff New Member

    Clyde Logo

    The logo was a flying seagull with the word "CLYDE" in block letters across it.....I was assuming your boat still had the logo decal's, but apparently not? Does it still have the manufacturers plate inside the transom?

    If you provide your email address, I can probably email you what the logo looks like......

    I would be interested to know what year the plant officially went out of business, or, who bought the company:?: :?: :?:
     
  10. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    decal

    I am replacing the transom and will look on the old, but I don't think that is the original transom. Would love info on the decal. If worse came to worse I could have a friend of mine replicate it and paint it on. Where was it located generally on the boat?

    Thanks again for all your info. I hope to learn more.
     
  11. smirnoff
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: Lake St Clair

    smirnoff New Member

    Decal

    The logo decals were placed midship of each gunwale, just below the side rail.

    Question; how do you know the boat is a Clyde?
     
  12. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Two reasons I think, the person who gave the boat to my father, and it has a cold molded hull; I say that not because of any knowledge I have, but because of my father's knowledge. It also looks exactly like one of two pictures I was able to find on the internet, which is all I could find.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The Clyde I worked on was an Ashcroft build, not a traditional molded hull. They may appear similar to the novice, but an Ashcroft hull will have the inner and outer layer running on the same bias, overlapping the seams. Typical two layer, molded hulls have the planking oriented perpendicular to each other. Ashcroft is not quite as strong as a true molded hull, but the planking process is much faster and easier to keep fair on the molds.
     
  14. Hosey/ethel
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Iowa

    Hosey/ethel Junior Member

    Thanks for the info, and I am a novice...I have taken some pics and hope to get them up shortly, today or tomorrow. Would love all input on what I have.
     

  15. rrstone58
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: michigan

    rrstone58 New Member

    I'm going to re-do a 1963 clyde boat. Please go to my blogspot It is www.clydeboat.blogspot.com This is an old barn find that was sitting there for a long time. But looks to be in good shape. I love the workmanship of these old wooden boats.
     
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