Classic Plastic

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by SAQuestor, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. SAQuestor
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    SAQuestor Senior Member

    As a sort of addendum to the Pocket Cruiser thread I’d like to have a discussion about classic plastic boats.

    Let’s set our limiting definitions:

    1. Affordable – average asking price less than US$60,000.
    2. Length – over 28’ (8.5m) to less than 42’ (12.8m)
    3. Acceptable to good upwind sailing performance.
    4. Circumnavigation capable.
    5. Singlehanded capable.
    6. Cutter or ketch rig preferred.
    7. None or few known intrinsic maintenance issues, i.e., blisters, deck leaks, rotting chain plates, etc., etc.

    Please notice that I deliberately have not been specific in many areas. But I think that the average asking price will be the major culling factor.

    Perhaps this is too low, but my logic is this: US$100,000 total budget for boat and upgrades – sails, rigging, engine, tanks, batteries and other “stuff”. The working theory is that a $60k boat would be in better condition and need less upgrading than a $30k boat.

    Obviously there are potential issues with this working theory, but one can winnow lots of chaff to get at a few kernels of grain – i.e., those boats that are worth investing time and $$ into to get a safe passagemaker and at least have the potential to get back some (hopefully substantial) portion of the $$ invested, recognizing that upgrades are for reliability, safety and comfort, not resale value.

    So… Which classic plastic boats would you want to sail away on? Let’s share some thoughts and develop a list of suitable candidates.

    Best,

    Leo
     
  2. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Thats the killer, not the price. Otherwise 2 come immeidaetly to mind...

    Ranger 33

    [​IMG]

    Or Cal 40

    [​IMG]
     
  3. SAQuestor
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    SAQuestor Senior Member

    I've emphasized the operative word in that statement.

    Doesn't mean that the boat's gotta be a ketch or cutter, just that's my personal preference. YMMV.

    BTW, I'm not familiar with the Ranger - designed for blue water work?
     
  4. naval ark
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    naval ark Member

    No doubt about it... Bristol Channel Cutter!!

    Only 28ft Length on Deck, but has the comfort of a much larger yacht. Beautiful, classic design :)
     
  5. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Try here: http://www.latitude38.com/features/bomRanger33.htm

    I owned a Ranger 26 and would have moved up to a 33 (or 37) in a heartbeat. All of those boats (the Rangers and Cal) came off the boards of good designers before IOR/sled days. They are all capable of offshore work (though the 26 is a bit small for long voyages more than solo) and work decently to weather in the rough as well as being well behaved off the wind.

    You could add the Santana 37/39 to that list also.
    [​IMG]

    Hummmm...two Mulls' and a Lapworth....is there a trend here. :D
     
  6. mattotoole
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    mattotoole Senior Member

    Yes, but for $60-100k? Forget it!

    How about a Cal 39 Mk II? I crewed on one of these, and it seemed like a boat that could go anywhere.

    Many production sailboats may not be sturdy enough for rough offshore passages. They also tend to come up short on storage and tankage.

    The Willard 8 Ton is a sturdy boat for a good price, with lots of storage and tankage. Its big iron genoa could make up for any lack of upwind sailing performance.

    This Endeavour 32 looks like a good boat too.
     
  7. captphil
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    captphil New Member

    There are any number of cca type boats out there that would make great bluewater cruisers. My experience has been that the main difference between a $30,000 boat and a $1,000 boat is $29,000. Phil
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Very astute observation Phil, if on a 5 year old thread, anything else, maybe not quite so obvious? . . . welcome aboard
     
  9. souljour2000
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    souljour2000 Senior Member

    Good thread that needed revival so thanks Cap'n Phil...maybe the peanut gallery can give life to this thread's re-incarnation...should include boats 24-feet and bigger though...
     
  10. captphil
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    captphil New Member

    Thanks for the kind words. I have prepped 3 boats to go to sea. A Nicholson 32, A Northern 25, and a Pearson Triton. The first 2 were basically sound boats that needed just a little work, each surveyed out well. The Triton was purchased for $400 as a derelect. In terms of labor and after purchase expense all 3 worked out about the same. Before heading for the bluewater the captain must be absolutly sure of every system aboard, and that means personaly checking everything. Thru hulls, hoses, clamps, rigging, sails, wiring, electronics, on and on. The Northern 25 is a fine little boat often overlooked. Carefully designed and constructed, a tribute to her Canadian builders. The Chesapeake has loads of old negleglected sailboats just waiting for an enterprising owner. Phil
     

  11. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member

    My Rhodes Bounty II must qualify as well as the Pearson Invicta and the Alberg 37 though none of these are cutters or ketches.

    Increase your budget and put the Shannon 38 cutter ketch in the running perhaps.
     
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