Chrysler Crown Marine Engine dilema

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by howie, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. howie
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    howie New Member

    I am looking for a manual for a Chrysler Crown Marine Engine (ex army M2) we have dismantled the engine some time ago while building boat for it.
    Need to determine whether number one conrod goes to the flywheel end (front of the motor in the boat) or does it go from the gear box end.
     
  2. Redtick
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    Redtick Junior Member

    Most of the time on one rod per throw of the crank, it does not matter.
    Numbering convention is balancer back, numbers to the camshaft side of the block. Unless someone is dyslexic or left handed.

    My brother-in-law dismantled a engine, not looking if anything was marked, put everything in one bucket. When I asked him why he did not mark anything, he said, "They do that at the factory". =)
     
  3. howie
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    howie New Member

    Chrysler Crown Marine engine dilema!

    We are using the same bearings and want to get the rods on the same journal.
    Can you clarify for us the comment. "Most of the time on one rod per throw of the crank it does not matter"
    We know that the ignition timing starts at the flywheel end - This is opposite to a car engine- we want to be sure of the original order of the rods, whether they are '1' from the flywheel end or the gearbox end.
    Mary and Graham
     
  4. Redtick
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    Redtick Junior Member

    One rod per crankshaft rod journal.
    All the rods should be the same bore and length. Using the same bearings, I would not do, but look on the back side of the bearings for any stampings that may show an oversize bearing. Mic the journals for undersize, uniform size and being round. Use plastigauge to check clearances, even after using a mic.

    http://www.plastigaugeusa.com/how.html

    Hone the cylinders and use new rings and bearings, it will save you money in the long run.

    If in doubt, it's always cheaper in the long run to have a machine shop or engine rebuilder do the work.
     
  5. Redtick
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    Redtick Junior Member

    Think about this, the main bearing with the thrust bearing would be considered, toward the back. Number one would be at the other end.
    IMHO, HTH lol
     
  6. howie
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    howie New Member

    chrysler Crown Marine Engine

    Thanks for your conversation - ironically we do have years of experience with assembling engines - this however has us challenged primarily because of failing to appropriately identify the order for the conrods as we dismantled them.
    The engine has particular differences and we were hoping to be able to obtain a manual that would be sufficient to identify the question of concern.
    regards
    Mary and Graham
     
  7. Redtick
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    Redtick Junior Member

    Not knowing the experience of someone online can be frustrating, I myself pulled wrenches for a living for 18 years on diesel and gas engines.

    There is an online company showing manuals for sale for your engine at.

    http://www.trojanboats.net/chryslerparts.pdf
    HTH =)
     
  8. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    The old Chris Crafts often used Crowns.....suggest posting on a CC forum
     
  9. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Not knowing the engine ( maybe) and its Chris Craft related, i would guess its a normal engine but driven from the timing case, I have worked on several chevs that were done like this both marinised by chris craft and volvo.
    The internals were as they were in a conventional engine.
    Be careful incase they re number the cylinders and hence they have what appears to be a weird firing order but if you used the original numbering system from the front/timingcase end, the firing order would appear normal

    This will apply ( i.e. std reverse firing order) even if its a reverse rotation engine which they usually were when connected to a stern drive so the input rotation remains the same.
    Reverse rotation chevs ( very common from MerCruiser, Crusader etc)have a gear driven cam rather then chain drive so the oil pump and distributor remain the same.
    I cant remember what chryslers did.
    Cheers
     
  10. Redtick
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    Redtick Junior Member

    With the timing marks on the crankshaft and cam gear aligned, would not the lobes on the number one cylinder will be in a position for the valves to be closed? All others would be out of sync.
     
  11. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    I couldnt say, you have the problem of where is number 1 and not sure on a chysler but on a chev the marks dont line up with number 1 firing its number 6 although number 1 is also at tdc
    I would try getting a manual for the engine
     
  12. broke_not
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    broke_not Junior Member

    Please elaborate. When the first cylinder number in a firing order is number 1, then when the timing components are installed and marks lined up, cylinder number 1 is at TDC with the valves closed....
     
  13. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Number 1 is also at TDC
    Most people never realise this as they set the cam up correct then keep building and fit the timing cover and balancer then use the balancer timing marks to fit the distributor not realising that if they then pulled the balancer and timing cover the cam mark with be at 12 oclock...180 degrees from when they installed it.

    Inline 6 chev, the markes are not aligned when no 1 is firing not even 180 out
    The marks just align crank and cam who cares where that is?
     
  14. broke_not
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    broke_not Junior Member

    Okay, I see what you mean now. Unlike most situations, when the cam and crank marks are lined up, the #1 piston is at TDC, but not on the compression stroke.

    http://www.speedprint.com/deves50/doc/enginetiming.pdf

    In the link above it shows the timing marks on the cam and crank with #1 in the firing position. Aren't they exactly 180 out?
     

  15. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Yes same like the v8 chev

    if the marks are dot to dot ( like most manuals expalin it )cyl 1 is not firing but still tdc
    The manufacturer can do what they like as they are only concerned with the cam and crank.

    (whoops Yes so that makes my story on the inline wrong)
    Was the stovebolt different or maybe it was a Nash I was just working on?
     
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