Chinese Junk to Schooner?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by mike krausser, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. mike krausser
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    mike krausser New Member

    OK, it might be random, but does anyone know any details or resources for learning about the possibility of changing the rig over from Junk to traditional or staysail Schooner on a Segel 44'?? You can either respond here or e-mail me directly. Thanks! Mike
     
  2. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Mike,

    The most critical parts of such are rig conversion are also the most prosaic--where are the current masts located in relation to the hull profile and the interior, and where will the new masts go--can they be mounted in the same places so that the interior is disturbed as little as possible, or will they have to be moved? Pretty practical stuff.

    You should consult a naval architect on this to sort through the various options as they may come to light. First off, the new sailplan will have to be balanced properly with the hull underwater profile so that the boat will sail properly with the right amount of weather helm. You start analyzing this by doing a trial sailplan with the masts in the original positions. If the sailplan works out OK, then fine, proceed with the next details for the rig. However, if the balance just cannot be made to work with the existing mast openings, then something has to give. Where will the masts move to, and how much will that disturb the interior? These questions can be answered only after a more thorough analysis of the boat design, structure, and interior arrangement.

    Once the masts are placed, then the rest of the design follows pretty traditional methods--work out the standing rigging and mast sections, design the booms, and figure out the rigging hardware for the main deck--halyards, sheets, reefing lines, etc.

    Eric
     
  3. mike krausser
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    mike krausser New Member

    Thank you Eric for your reply. I kinda figured that the hull shape would help determine whether the existing mast configuration would fly... Would you happen to know much about Segel yachts? Or where to learn about them? I've tried an initial Google search without much luck.
    Thanks again...
    mike
     

  4. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Mike,

    Unfortunately, no, I have no background information on the Segel 44. Cruising World magazine in Rhode Island had a column, and I think they still do, called "Another Opinion" which is a database of people and their boats who are willing to offer information about their experiences with different kinds and brands of boats. The database is arranged by boat type/design, so you may have some luck there. Also, Sailing magazine out of Wisconsin runs Bob Perry's design reviews, and he may have done a review on the design. Bob lives right there in Seattle, so you might want to call him on the phone and ask if he has any background on the design.

    Eric
     
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