Cheap paint for meranti plywood

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Florida_Skiffs, Feb 22, 2013.

  1. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Dont want to pay 150 dollars a gallon for paint, What type or brand is good for wood? thank you
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A single part polyurethane is a good choice on encapsulated plywood. If the plywood isn't encapsulated, than a good quality alkyd will do. Acrylic would be the last on the list, but also the cheapest.
     
  3. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

  4. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Im going to epoxy the part below the waterline and bottom paint it then use blue water alkyd for the rest
     
  5. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    I used Polyurethane on meranti with no problems. It was Interlux Brightside. There are other brands just as good.
     
  6. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    I once used one part oil based polyurethane floor finish (very tough), and added powered pigment to give it some color. You can buy the pigment by the pound cheap. It was cheaper than buying colored polyurethane paint.
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You don't need "bottom paint" (anti fouling) unless you plan to store the boat in the water. If you do plan on keeping this boat in the water, you'll need total epoxy encapsulation, not just spot treatments or she'll rot pretty quickly.
     
  8. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    I do plan on keeping it at my dock in the water, So should i encapsulate it inside and out? Saltwater btw
     
  9. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    PAR wrote;

    "If you do plan on keeping this boat in the water, you'll need total epoxy encapsulation, not just spot treatments or she'll rot pretty quickly."

    This boat's been in the water a very long time and most of it isn't rotten yet. Much is I'm sure but she's been around for probably 85 years and it's likely she's never seen epoxy or anything but oil based paint.
     

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  10. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Very confusing forum
     
  11. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    PAR is answering the plywood questions you are asking. Look closely at the image E R posted, it is carvel planked, a completely different set of rules apply.
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, Milehog nailed it. That old cruiser is a carvel, probably a hardwood over frames deal and a completely different animal.

    Plywood, if high quality marine grade will last a fairly long time, with just paint, but issues will eventually develop, just from living in the wet. If low quality big box store plywood is used, it'll rot pretty much after the first year afloat, regardless of paint type used.

    This is why we encapsulate plywood boats. This is just as the word suggests and every nook, cranny, notch, screw hole, especially the end grain and all surfaces need a 10 mil coating of epoxy, to keep moisture from getting at it, plus paint or varnish to protect the epoxy from UV.
     
  13. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    "This is why we encapsulate plywood boats. This is just as the word suggests and every nook, cranny, notch, screw hole, especially the end grain and all surfaces need a 10 mil coating of epoxy, to keep moisture from getting at it, plus paint or varnish to protect the epoxy from UV."

    Wot he says....if it is not done absolutely with great care, you just wasted a lot of money. Done correctly, you have a good investment. I did a 32 footer in 1972, it is as good today as the day she was launched....take care, do it once and do it right.
     
  14. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Obviously the best thing i can do is use meranti, and glass it and epoxy it, which i probably will do, but if using bix box store plywood, glassed and epoxeyed, and bottom painted, and is left in the water, how long can i expect it to not be rotten
     

  15. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Times up.
     
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