cement question (house not boat)

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by WickedGood, Nov 29, 2010.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, you can get paint to stick.
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    How? The plastic is polyethelene or something similar. Do you mean it would be a simple matter of applying a practical reasonably priced locally available product?
    I know there're usually chemically ways to do almost anything but I thought, what would I do? For example, I wouldn't order a product that came in a quart container that cost say, $20.00 plus shipping (or more) to repair the bottom of a garage door. I would limit my search to what could be gotten locally on a Saturday morning.
    But regardless, what is the product? Obviously, it would be great to be able to paint an old poly canoe or kayak.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    [​IMG]
    There are other options, but this stuff actually works for a lot less then your 20 dollar bill too.
     
  4. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Much appreciated. How long has the stuff been around?
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    More than a decade.
    The rustoleum brand didn't work so well for me though. Krylon is better IMHO.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The first formulations of this stuff (all brands) didn't preform very well (peel strength as you'd expect), but reformulations since have vastly improved these products. For the small job you're looking at, an ideal product. For a larger project I'd consider one of a few different methods, the first would be carbonizing the plastic with a torch or heat gun, then applying epoxy as a primer, before top coating normally, especially if I had to match a specific color or type paint.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    One inch is nothing. Use a wide weather strip under the door. KISS
     
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  8. Waddie
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Kansas City

    Waddie Waddie

    door fix

    Gonzo, I respectfully disagree. One inch difference between the two lower corners of the door is something. That door is likely to be slammed shut thousands of times during it's lifespan. One corner hitting first every time will eventually loosen up the entire door. Lots of stress on the panel hinges each time, which will eventually loosen. Stress on the track roller bearings. If it is a wood door the panels will probably loosen in the wood frame. Even worse on a double wide door. This will happen over time, but it will effect the integrity of the door.

    Opinions will vary,

    Waddie
     
  9. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Spring load both ends with one spring shorter.
     
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  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Or a 1" tall "stopper rock" on the side with the gap that will hit second. I sell stopper rocks.... they're $5 plus shipping. Will ship by the dozen. :)
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I disagree Waddie, Most modern garage doors are center pulled and balance on this central pivot when being lowered or raised.. This has a very logical reason, to permit to the door to assume whatever angle it has to, when it bottoms out or more importantly when it encounters an obstruction. A modern door opener will permit quite a bit of latitude, in the amount of crush pressure (typically adjustable) and the door's hardware (wheel guides and center pull mount) side to side play. The average door wheel guide will permit 2" of sloppiness, either in bent or distorted tracks or an irregular surface to park on, in the down position. The smart or experienced door installer will place the tracks, not at the edge of the door, but a few inches past this, to again allow the door to "rack" if necessary for what ever reason as it travels through it's motion up or down.

    Hoyt, all doors have a specific weight that needs to be "hung" and the springs (torsional or whip tackle usually). Too little of spring pressure and it's hard to open, maybe enough to strip gears in your opener or your back if manual. If you have too much spring tension the door can't close tight, if at all. If you short one side over the other (spring pressure), then the door will rise and fall crooked and you can assure yourself of jams and other binding issues.

    Just pull up a street view in suburban San Francisco and look at the garage doors where they have a hilly street. The bottom of the doors have a huge wedge attached in some cases.
     
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  12. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I don't think I'm ever going to close a garage door again without thinking of this thread. More than being just another discussion on the not insignificant problem of garagious mouse and errant leaf ingress, it is truly a treatise on how to live one's life as a true and righteous workshoppist and gentleman.
     
  13. Waddie
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Kansas City

    Waddie Waddie

    door fix

    Actually, this has been a pretty good thread. It's been informational and civil, both qualities in short supply on the 'net.

    Usually I only read the boat forums and don't offer advice, as I'm not much of an expert in the area. But I have had some experience installing and servicing overhead doors.

    I don't mind that PAR disagreed with me. I have a set of plans on order from him and don't plan to cancel !! :)

    It's time to turn in.
    Respectfully,

    Waddie
     
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  14. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Good for you. Just being humorous. Which boat plan did you buy?
     

  15. Waddie
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Kansas City

    Waddie Waddie

    door fix

    Alan,

    I ordered the design #19.8. It is a 23' open dayboat, probably will come in around 2000lbs. tow weight. I don't want to keep a slip. Paul designed it back in the 80's I think. He is in the process of converting it to e-files now. It is shoal draft and very trailerable.

    Many companies offer "trailerable" boats in the 23-26' class that can be pulled by a trailer but would be a pain to trailer and launch on a regular basis. The mast I will use weighs only 40lbs and I have a neat mast raising system that works well for single handing, so that sometimes difficult job is accounted for.

    I plan to strip plank in western red cedar with the rest in Doug Fir or as specified on the design. I will glass it all. I've been buying hardware a little at a time on e-bay and other sites as fitting out is a higher cost than the building materials. I've got just about everything I need except for parts like chainplates, anchor roller, etc which I will fabricate and weld up.

    Thanks for the interest :)
    Waddie
     
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