Cavitation higher than expected at very low speed

Discussion in 'Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics' started by John Rivers, Oct 9, 2022.

  1. John Rivers
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    John Rivers Junior Member

    https://phys.org/news/2022-01-low-speed-impacts-liquids.html

    "They showed that even at speeds as slow as one meter per second, the impact can decrease the local pressure sufficiently to cause cavitation. This comes about because the liquid is slightly compressible, and so the impact creates waves of large pressure that reflect from the surface to form negative pressure regions.

    Only objects that contained an edge led to cavitation. The team saw no such effect when they investigated the impact of a 20-millimeter-diameter sphere, for example."
     
  2. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    These findings are fully consistent with the "classical" theory for pressure transients ("water hammer").
     
    John Rivers likes this.
  3. Doug Halsey
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    Doug Halsey Senior Member


  4. John Rivers
    Joined: Oct 2022
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    Location: Maryland

    John Rivers Junior Member

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