Casting vs Laminating Resin

Discussion in 'Materials' started by seltzer_water, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. seltzer_water
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    seltzer_water New Member

    Hi,

    I'm trying to waterproof wood and I'm trying to find polyester resin locally. I found an art store that sells Polyester Casting Resin. How is this different to laminating resin (marine boat resin?) and can it still be used as waterproof resin?

    Thanks!
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No it can´t. Neither can laminating polyester resin! It is not completely water resistant like Epoxy resin. And it does not stick well to any material, especially wood.
    What is the application you have in mind? How "waterproof" has it to be?

    Regards
    Richard
     
  3. seltzer_water
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    seltzer_water New Member

  4. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    You can throw out almost all of the information in the link to the "secret waterproofing mix".
     
  5. Itchy&Scratchy
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    Itchy&Scratchy Senior Member

    Just out of interest, the site you have a link to is all about saving the planet, living green etc..........
    and they are advocating using fibreglass?????????????

    Resin is an oil based product!!! The sort of industry you guys are choosing to reduce is exactly the one you are now wanting to use.:?: :?:
    Any thoughts??:confused:


    Regards
    J
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    No time to waste on these "religious" sites, sorry.
    When you are going to make wood waterproof you can encapsulate it in Epoxy resin. Just smeere the goo on in two or three layers, tahts it. When you need some abrasion resistance add a glassfibre fabric.
    Paint the surface, epoxy deteriorates under UV rays otherwise.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There is epoxy casting resin. It is made by one of the companies in the list of "Evil Conspirators Against Our Holy Mother". You know, DuPont, CibaGeigy, one of those ;)
     
  8. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Yes you can waterproof wood with epoxy resin, Seltzer.

    A little bit of prep though. You need a pipe where the wood fits into. Then pour heated epoxy resin into it, and apply pressure to the pipe. Heat will cause the air in the wood to expand and bubble out. When the compressed air is applied the resin will be forced into the wood.

    You then take the wood out and place it somewhere to cool and cure. You cannot use polyester resin, it cures too fast.
     
  9. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Come on, guys, don't make fun of him.

    Fro waterproofing wood, please get some nice laminating epoxy or wood compatible epoxy (well, most epoxies are, some are just a tad better). I would suggest some product of West System, System Three or MAS Epoxy, probably there are more out there in the USA, but I am not too familiar on brands there.

    Apply a first coat. Let cure. Sand.
    Apply a second coat. Let cure for an hour or 2.
    Apply third coat. Let cure. Sand.
    Apply 4th coat. Let cure. Sand.
    Apply a PU coating, can be transparent or coloured. If using a transparent one, make sure it has UV inhibitors. Epoxy degrades under influence of UV.

    For applying these coats nice and smooth, West System has nice foam covered cardboard rollers. I am sure other brands have similar rollers. Also check the instructions that are on the West System website. Even if not using their epoxy, you will learn a lot.
     
  10. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Dead serious. Can you suggest anything better to resin the whole piece of wood to the core ? How do you think wood gets treated for harsh environments ?
     
  11. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Do you see this guy putting his tub in an autoclave?

    I know the system you describe, and it works wonders, it is just the virtual impossibility for a DIY-er to do this. So lets give him decent advise, which he CAN perform.
     
  12. seltzer_water
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    seltzer_water New Member

    sounds like awesome and great ideas, thanks for the inputs so far

    but this little girl just needs something long lasting and easy 'cause her funds are limited. and the wee little tub's just going to fit into a bathtub and never going to see the light of day. it just needs to be able to take a beating from shower water and soaking water, much like boats do out in the wide open sea, except in a much gentler environment.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A couple of coats of epoxy should work fine. Don't mind the joking.
     
  14. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    And skimp on the sanding! Assuming you have a planed surface, for what would you need to sand it? I assume you´re not going to give a bathtub a piano finish??!
    Apply three layers of epoxy resin, the absolute cheapest you can find is a perfect choice for that application. Do´nt worry, there are absolutely NO technical aspects you have to care about.
    Apply the resin wet in wet. That means, when the first layer is NOT cured completely (i.e. you can press your fingernail in the surface, or it´s tacky), you apply the next one, when thats done, the last. Let it cure (min 24 hrs. above 24°C) in a warm dry place. The higher the temperature the better (do´nt burn the house). Than apply paint or varnish or even nothing, when there is definetively no UV light exposure.

    Regards
    Richard
     

  15. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    ... or if you do not care about slight yellowing. Which, technically, is not worrying.
     
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