canoe

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by prathab, Jun 19, 2014.

  1. prathab
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: india

    prathab Junior Member

    i have a drawing of 23 feet electric engine canoe boat. in that the building process is plywood planking with strich glue type ... for that there is no need of stringers ,.. by the way i am going to build veneer canoe of the same , for this building i should put some stringers so that i can make nice shape of canoe . can you guide me how &where to mark the stringer line ? , how many stringer is enough for this boat . loa 23' , beam 6' ,
    thank you
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I think you need a real of plans. The questions you are asking indicate you are designing your own boat but you don't know how. The design you started with, the plywood one, is for flat panel construction. Veneer, presumably cold-molded, is for a rounded hull form.
    So the question appears to make no sense.
     
  3. prathab
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: india

    prathab Junior Member

    i have original plan in which the hull construction is plywood strips of 150 mm width planking at zero degree ,.. now i want to do veneer cold mouldiing 45 degree / 45 degree planking , so for this i need some stringers to do planking to get perfect shape & finish. can you guide me how to mark stringers position ,,,
     
  4. alan white
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I wouldn't add stringers if the original plan using plywood strips didn't call for them. Using the right wood you should be at least as strong as plywood without stringers. Are sure the hull would need stringers? For example, if you used a wood that was lighter than the plywood called for, the hull could be a little thicker at the same weight. Then the hull would be a bit stiffer than the one built of plywood.
    By the way, why change the building materials from the original plan?
     
  5. prathab
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: india

    prathab Junior Member

    let me explain clearly ,
    original plan was : 9 plywood hull planking with the support of temporary stations ,
    since it doesnt have stingers ( temporary or permanent ) the 3 mm veneer at 45degree will not give perfect curved shape while planking , so that i need 2 or 3 stringers, while planking i will staple the veneer on the stringers .
    if i use red cedar wood for planking , i will do varnish inside & some part of outside , thats why i am going for veneer planking .
    sorry for not explaining you clearlly ... can you able to catch my point ,
     
  6. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    I'm assuming your stringers are to shape the hull only, not a permanent part of the structure.
    Your going to have to go with what "feels right" If you have some of your veneer try it at different spacings on the bench at varying distances apart until you find a maximum width that feels firm.
    Use softwood so the staples come out easier.
    Starting at the centre lay your stringers around the stations, it will be very obvious where they are comfortable lying and where they need to be forced. Don't force them, just allow them to lay to the shape within the spacings you have determined.
    Have a look at the Gougeons book it's a free download.

    http://www.westsystem.com/ss/assets/...k 061205.pdf

    For what it's worth I would strip plank. Still a great look but cheaper wood.
     

  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Adding on to red's info, the fact is that you dont have to worry about the positioning of the stringers very much. Just make sure they cross the major waterlines of the hull.

    They dont even have to run parallel to he chines, or anything else.

    Just ,make sure that you do the same for both sides of the boat.

    Look at the pattern on the attached hull, but you can leave much bigger gaps.

    That photo is from


    by
    http://bowdidgemarinedesigns.com/Bowdidge_Marine_Designs_1/Strip_Plank.html
     

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