Can you help identify my boat?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Lone Ranger, Oct 13, 2013.

  1. Lone Ranger
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Georgia

    Lone Ranger Junior Member

    I recently came into possession of a 20-foot trailer sailer that I'm having trouble identifying.

    It is apparently a pre-1972 model, with a stamped ID number on the upper left of the transom: APL001260. Its mainsail has the number 126 on it and seems to have been made by Gleason Sailmakers.

    The mast is about 22'1", plus the block atop it, and the boom is about 9'4".

    It has a step-through transom, on the starboard side.

    Has a swing keel, with the lowering mechanism accessible from the cockpit through an appx 4" round access port below the cabin entry. The access port is secured by a circular cover that rotates a quarter turn to open - just like the three other vent holes in the sides of the cockpit.

    The cockpit cover is hinged, and has a prop rod about the size of a broomstick handle to hold it up.

    The registration number on it is no longer useable to get information on it... It has been out of registration for several years and the number has been recycled but not reassigned, so no data is available there.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks for any help here!
     
  2. Lone Ranger
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    Lone Ranger Junior Member

    Here are some photos.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That particular MIC is shown as Anarchy Powerboats LLC in Phoenix, but that's not who built it. I think I recognize the boat and it was built by Apollo Boats out of Clearwater, FL. Not a lot of information is available about Apollo, mostly because they just got killed by the other major players in the trailer sailer industry of the era. Back in the early 70's (that looks to be a '72), there were at least dozen trailer sailer poptop cruisers and this was one of them. I was working for another manufacture of 22' trailer sailer, poptop cruisers at the time, just down the street in St. Pete and we all kind of knew each other, bouncing around from plant to plant, depending on who was hiring. I think Apollo was purchased by AMF or someone, after just a few years of production. They weren't the best build going at the time and hardware was as cheap as you could install. The transom has a plywood core (I think) and this may be soft from water getting past the cut out trim and if the poptop seems to weigh a ton when lifting it, it too likely has a moisture saturated core.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  4. Lone Ranger
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    Lone Ranger Junior Member

    That was fast, PAR! I appreciate the information. At least it gives me a starting point.

    This will be a project, but hopefully not too much of one. It was last sailed around four years ago and has been sitting out in the weather. At least I know it should be watertight - it was full of rainwater!

    Poptop seems pretty light, so maybe it's okay.

    As there is a real lack of online information on Apollo sailboats (especially 20-footers), would you possibly have any contacts I could link up with to find out more about the company and this boat?

    Many thanks!
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Nope, the company was eaten up by a larger outfit, which also died the lonely death many of these did in the "dark years" of the late 70's. It was a mom and pop type of business and records where likely swallowed by the new owners, just to be filed in some box, in some warehouse and forgotten. Good luck with the search, but there where a lot of companies that had this happen (including mine) back then.

    Again, the transom should be checked, especially where the gudgeons and backstay attach, plus the cut out area and any other penetrations (outboard bracket, etc.). The deck and some areas below may have plywood or solid wood stiffeners, backing things up and these should be checked too.
     
  6. Lone Ranger
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    Lone Ranger Junior Member

  7. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    messabout Senior Member

    All hail PAR who seems capable of identifying a vast array of older boats and their manufacturers. That's a forum asset, sort of a Wickiboat methinks.
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are several that are better than me at this sort of thing. Doug Lord usually beats me to it and the old Paul B was also good at this too.
     
  9. Lone Ranger
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    Lone Ranger Junior Member

    I was really amazed at how quickly this question was answered. And what are the odds that it was answered by someone who worked near that small manufacturer?

    Now if I can only find someone who has a manual for it...

    Thanks again, PAR! You rock!
     
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  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well you see, I have a "magic wand" and I like to wave it around. At least this is what my other half tells me anyway.

    You'll find we have so many members, all (many) versed in various aspects of the industry and lots of old farts, that have been around the block several times, so really not much of a surprise. You just got lucky. This may very well be the quickest and only luck you have with this project, so enjoy it while it lasts or at least until the itching starts. Good Luck . . .
     
  11. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Magic wand waving...got my attention here...

    There was a dancer in a Chicago club owned by Filthy Phil Tucker back in the day, called the Blue Dalia (don't ask) whose stage moniker was Magic Wand Wilma or something like that...thanks for reminder.

    And you do help us much here, as messabout implied, for which we are very thankful, especially this dodger.
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You're way too easy to please Bob, but thanks and you too Messabout. Now, send me some pictures of the dancer, would 'ya.
     
  13. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Par, you are too kind. I know direct, good info when I see it and always willing to learn.

    Yourself, Alan White, gggguest, epoxymoron, Vegas, MajorTom, tikipete, proa, Clark and others, have proved invaluable and saved me and many others much grief in (our) humble wee projects.

    That you and the others take the time is worthy of thanks, believe me.
     
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  14. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Way to go ,Paul-I wouldn't have gotten this one.....
     
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  15. Lone Ranger
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Lone Ranger Junior Member

    It's been a long while since PAR helped me identify my boat. As I was refurbishing it, I found that the actual hull ID number was a bit longer than I thought. It says it was actually made in May 1974.

    I recently found that this boat appears to be a derivative of the Helsen 22.

    Here are some photos of my renovation of it so far. Although I spent far longer on it than I initially planned, I hope to get it (finally) in the water in the next few days.
     

    Attached Files:

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