Can I thin my primer?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by LP, Jul 19, 2012.

  1. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Does it make any sense to thin roll on primer? It doesn't seem to do the wetted edge bit very well and I am getting additional thickness at the overlap. I'm trying to avoid the additional sanding required to get a smooth primer coat.
     
  2. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    What kind of primer are you using?

    I've always used Interlux Epoxy Primecoat and have to thin it about 20-25% depending on temperature.
     
  3. thudpucker
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Al.

    thudpucker Senior Member

    Does thinning a Primer make it sink further into the wood?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can thin it and usually it's necessary to spray it, but it also means you need more coats for the same film thickness. If it's leaving an edge, you're probably working in conditions, that the paint can't cope with. Lower the temperature and humidity and your wet edge will return. If you can't, you need to add some "wetting agent" like Penatrol, which apparently now has an acrylic version too, to supplement the alkyd.
     
  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    MIA,

    I completely missed your post. I'm working Interlux Brightsides paint and I'm using their primer for the product.

    To All,

    Do you think that 10 year old primer might be the problem?:rolleyes:The new stuff is going on much nicer and the temperature has dropped to boot.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Paint, much like you love life, has a shelf life. If the 10 year old stuff is not flowing, it's probably lost some vehicle and some of the solids have congealed. You can bring it back with more vehicle and lots of agitation and mixing, but it'll probably never be as good as a new patch. Save this stuff for areas with deep grooves and scratches, where the heavier body can help fill, knowing 90% will be sanded away. Over coat with fresh stuff for final primer coats.
     
  7. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    The formulation may well have changed in that period also, in Aus it has. Jeff.
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Good point Jeff, I'll bet you're right about that. I'm not too familiar with Interlux primers, having never used them, but alkyds have gone though a lot of changes in the last decade.
     
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