Can I build boat transom in this way ?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by hyboats, Dec 21, 2012.

  1. hyboats
    Joined: Jun 2010
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    hyboats Junior Member

    I know wood transom will rot easily.Last month I bought a high density of foam board, I think it is the same as cutting board in my kitchen, and not strong as GRP board.
    In my workroom there are many small GRP pieces left no use, such as cutted from hatches. Now I am thinking can I laminate them together then used as a transom :D:D
    This will be much stronger and heavier then high density foam, aslo save much money. :p
    How about my idea ? :?:
     
  2. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    No good. Use plywood. Encapsulate in epoxy all surfaces. The transom might well outlast you if you pay attention to details.
     
  3. hyboats
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    hyboats Junior Member

    why ??? I think they will last longer time then wood.
     
  4. hyboats
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    hyboats Junior Member

    :confused:
    why ??? I think they will last longer time then wood.
     
  5. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    No expert here, but I think if its the board used in cutting boards, it is
    High Density Polyethylene Plastic

    You are right about it being rotproof, but the question will be how successfully it will bond in layers, and how strong it will end up as.

    Without having a sample, and knowing the size of the boat, my impression is that it may not end up sufficiently structurally stiff.

    Waterproof fastening to the existing hull may create issues as well, as standard epoxy wont adhere to it very well
     
  6. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    Your description of your idea is a bit vague and we don't even know what kind of boat you have -------and a lot of other details necessary to commenting intelligently.
    You said "... cutted from hatches...". Cut what? Plywood? Fiberglass? Spend a little time, relax, and try to include as much information as possible.
     
  7. OFFSHORE GINGER
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    OFFSHORE GINGER Junior Member

    I , agree 100%
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    HDPE (cutting board stuff) would make a fine transom, except you can't bond to it (no adhesive sticks to it), it's really heavy for it's strength and stiffness and you can't screw to it very well either. Other than these small issues, it's great. Lots of things, including boat parts are made from it, though usually through bolted together or to other things.
     
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