Building a small work barge with plywood

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by indianbayjoe, Nov 20, 2010.

  1. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Need to build new barge. old wood one destroyed in storm. Looking at wood and steel. Possibilities for wood are a honeycomb or egg crate construction plywood deck barge 12 X 24. Other wood ideas were a steel/wood frame and plywood sheathing. Obviously this needs to be a low cost operation. We only had about $1000 in the original one. Looking for ideas. Thanks in advance
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,804
    Likes: 369, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

  3. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Dimensions are feet
     
  4. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    My employee is a designer by hobby. He had come up with a egg crate design using 3/4" plywood throughout the entire project. We had originally used an idea of a main frame work or beams and maybe some steel. Basically the unit will be used to set amd move anchors weighing up to 4000 pounds. We currently are using a 8' X 20' wooden dock section modified with a center opening and an A frame gantry for lifting and added a lot of floatation. Need more floatation and a litle more deck space so thats why the 12 X 24. Alao looked at going up to 30 feet in length but probably not necessary.
     
  5. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Thanks hoyt. I saw that site also. I really should not have used the term honeycomb but rateher the egg crate. I still feel that i would like some sort of substantial frame under the skin but maybe the egg crage will work and we will just coonstruct a frame work on the deck to support whatever lifting system we decide to go with.
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,804
    Likes: 369, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Thanks, Joe. Now, hopefully, someone who has built on that scale will have some good data to share with you.
     
  7. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    Forgot to mention the height. Probably 3 or 4 feet
     
  8. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Gee...big marine engineering project going on it the harbour at the moment. More than a dozen small barges in action. Everyone of them is built of steel. If your doing real work, it would be hard to beat the ruggedness, simplicity and ease of construction of a steel barge . 1000 dolars wont go far if you expect to built something 12 x 24 worthwhile.
     
  9. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    We had come up with a projected cost using the wood method at around $3000. If i could find a steel one for that price i'd be interested. I know it sounds like were being cheap but its a necessity. Our entire marina took a big hit in the storm and insurance will probably cover only a small portion of the damage.
     
  10. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Check the " ship and barge brokers ". They might have somthing for sale now that fits the bill.
     
  11. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    yea we have been. Best we found so far was 14 x 24 for $25,000. always looking
     
  12. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
    Posts: 794
    Likes: 43, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 324
    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    There is nothing wrong with a wood barge for the type work you're talking about. If the "honeycomb" or "eggcrate" is slotted and interlocking plywood used as support between the deck and the bottom, I think thats an outstanding idea.

    I the olden days when waterbeds were a big deal that how the frames supported the weight of the water mattress, very strong in compression.

    Galvanized fasteners, exterior wood glue, 2" x 2" lumber, 3/4" plywood, I would cover the plywood with lumber around the places the anchors were going to be dragged around and of course re inforce the deck where the gantry is going to be mounted. You could just give a coat of epoxy resin below the waterline if you wanted, would make it last a little longer.

    You are on the right track, I have seen barges like what you describe used for storing lobster traps and moving them about @ 80lb each x 100, pushed by an outboard powered skiff.

    Steve
     
  13. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Nothing wrong with a plywood barge. Easy and cheap to build. They just lack impact resistance and ruggedness. If you only need a barge for lightweight duty, plywood is the way to go. I seem to remember Woodenboat magazine doing a spread a few years ago on a really nice "yacht club " type motorized barge. It was a "push me, pull me "type with 2 small outboard motors stuck thru the deck..one aft for forward propulsion the other for reverse...push me pull me.
    Perhaps google Woodenboat..barge . It was a really elegant , simple, stitch and tape, Biax cloth set in epoxy sheathed, plywood barge. It might have even been a Phil Bolger design
     
  14. indianbayjoe
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 4, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: Lake Champlain

    indianbayjoe Senior Member

    we did intend to fiberglass over the outside and also tab and glass all the joints. The egg crate design also would allow for many compartments for individual floatation in case a leak occurs in a selction. My only worry,maybe unsubstantiated, is if there is enough longitudinal and lateral strength from end to end. The lifting rig, whatever design we end up with will use the barge for some support but will mainly just be sitting on top of the deck on its own frame with some sort of hold down devices. We might have a well in the center of the barge for uniform lifting. Our current barge is set up that way. We've got an outboard on the one now but usually use our 22 workboat to move it around.
     

  15. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,900
    Likes: 197, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.