Buccaneer 24 Builders Forum

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by oldsailor7, Jul 22, 2009.

  1. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Thanks Bruce - keep us posted on progress.
     
  2. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    OS, your bit of trivia was "1st Class" and quite funny at the end of the day, made me laugh - have you got any more gems like that ..:D
     
  3. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    LOL John.
    Gems are Gems because they are scarce.

    Try this.
    John Hitch, Holly North and I sailed from Sydney to Lord Howe Island in a club sailaway, on board Johns Crowther 45 catamaran "Hitchhiker". We were only cruising, on auto pilot all the way, (but incidently cracked "Helsals" then record for the crossing).
    It was mid summer and the weather was very hot.
    On the way back we ran under an enormous electrical storm. There was hail as big as golf balls. It was like being struck by cannon fire. We held our hands on the front windows to try and prevent them from being shattered.
    Holly stuck a bowl out into the cockpit and collected a pile of hailstones.
    A fly on the wall must have laughed it's head off as we sat around in the saloon sucking on balls of ice, to cool down. :eek:
     
  4. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Good strory OS, the strangest things do happen when one is out sailing, I relate to that story because Ive been caught out in a hail storm a couple of times, the noise of the hail hitting the boat is incredible and you loose all visibility, me and my partner would always endure the weather if at all possible, neither of us liked to spend to much time below deck when sailing (apart from having a brew) we both have something in common with a lot of other sailers here, including Lord Horatio Nelson -we all get nausea below deck.
     
  5. Headharbor
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Boothbay, Maine

    Headharbor Junior Member

    Re: folding buc

    Bruce,
    Very interesting concept, we all look forward to your progress. My Buc has an inner sleeve to secure the beams. This system is anything but user friendly. Four men struggled to get everything lined up last year, and I am reticent to repeat the experience. I am thinking of ways to sneek the boat down the road in the middle of the night to the nearest ramp (2 mi).

    You mentioned that you are not changing the load points on the boat. Have you considered removing your new pivot beam during the sailing season? You may be able to fabricate a sleeve that could be bolted on, to secure the beam. In this scenario, you could probably get away with wood for your pivot beam.

    Good luck!
     
  6. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    struts

    HH, The short answer is yes, the "folding" struts could be removable, particularly if you were starting with new, uncut beams. However, I intend to keep mine in place for several reasons. When I got my boat, the inner cross beams had "bell mouthed" from many years of sailing and wave action- the boat had spent most of its life in the water. I replaced the wooden connectors with alloy last season and shimmed them, but I could not take out all the play. I used turnbuckles on my forward water stays to take up the slack, which caused be float bows to ride low-the boat pointed well but it hurt speed as the main hull then rides stern-down. I can tighten the rig enough to raise the floats, but it is hard on the boat and the rig does not rotate well with that much tension. I have decided to address the folding and "loose" beams at the same time. I am adding a compression strut at the lower end of the struts to allow them to provide positive lift to the beams. The water stays will still provide the "down" force for sailing and rig tension. As the struts are only lifting about 500 lbs apiece, they don't have to be very robust, and even over-engineered are still under about 25 lbs a corner. With the stainless water stays replaced by synthetic and the middle cross beam out of lighter material, I will gain less than 10 lbs a corner, and might end up lighter than I started:)- with a very stiff boat. I hope it works:cool: B
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    climate considerations

    HH, I think the struts will help with snow loads too:D B
     
  8. diegokid
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: southeast

    diegokid Junior Member

    mine

    I haven't started mine yet so all this info is very interesting to me. One of the rteasons I looked at the corsair was due to slips not being here and the ease of rigging.

    As far as nausea I'm a retired flyer. We used to haul pax fairly often. Most people will not get airsick if they can see outside as being in the cockpit. Other thing was to lay them down in the lowest point in the plane. If we knew we were going to be in bad weather as a last resort we could run the cabin altitude up to 8000 to 8500 ft and most folks would be asleep in a matter of minutes.;)
     
  9. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    OS, If I can save a few pounds of weight here and there (it all adds up) on my build without compromising structual integrity I am all for it - you mentioned having 5/16" ss waterstays with adjustable turnbuckles on your Buc 28 - this sounds a good idea to me, I would like to do this with my build, have you any advice to pass on.
     
  10. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    May be one could use solid ss round bar 8mm (5/16" approx) with turnbuckles ?
     
  11. oldsailor7
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Sydney Australia

    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    John, I am not able to advise you on this. It may be that wire, swage fittings and turnbuckles, plus the swaging, is a more expensive way to go than the flat bar specified. The B28, being bigger would have greater forces to contend with. If you want to go this route you should be advised by the rigging Co who would do the swaging.
    I have no experience with solid rod rigging, so I can't comment.
     
  12. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Thanks OS - just to round this post off, Ive made a couple of tentative enquiries re: rod rigging for the waterstays - with Marine grade 316 8mm ( this dia is not set in stone) steel rodding and 316 Turnbuckles terminating at each end (eight in all) works out at approx 40% extra on total cost over 316 flat steel, nuts & bolts etc, its some way off my build at the moment, but the benefits of being able to adjust the stays and easier derigging plus a liitle saving on weight point me in that direction - thats my two pennies worth.
     
  13. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    John Jolly Senior Member

    Not quite a Trimaran, but someone spent some time building it ? I have no idea how she can see where she is going..! small-boat.jpg
     
  14. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    nice cabin

    But will it go to weather? B
     

  15. John Jolly
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: United Kingdom

    John Jolly Senior Member

    Not sure Bruce, but its definitley been antifouled - its leaving a fair wake......
     
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