Bonding Stringer Grid to Liner

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Moreheadnc, Aug 22, 2012.

  1. Moreheadnc
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Morehead City

    Moreheadnc Junior Member

    Soon I will be to the point where I will be dropping my liner back in the boat and on to my new stringers. I have been looking for a product to bond the liner to the stringers.

    I came across nexus ma590 but that seems to cost a fortune. I would like a product that will give me an hour to fit the liner as well as a 1" bead. I was thinking thickened polyester resin with a slow cure but I'm thinking by the time I mix that quantity and squirt it out my time will be about out.

    What do you guys recommend?
     
  2. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    stick it ??

    polyester thickened is not a good choice has to be something better than that plus if possilbe you need to be able to glass it in place as well . a liner takes twisting a racking so there could be a enormouse strain on what ever you pick on to stick it
     
  3. Moreheadnc
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Morehead City

    Moreheadnc Junior Member

    A little about the boat:

    1981 20' Wellcraft Step V center console. There is a grid system substructure that takes all of the force. 3/4" marine grade ply with 4 layers (8 layers total) of 17 oz biax making it very strong for the size.

    I'm not really concerned with a structural component of the vessel versus performance in the adhesives ability to prevent the sole from separating giving the sole the feel of a soft/rotten deck. I did replace the deck with 1/2" divynicell H80 utilizing the original deck skin and 2 layers of 17 oz underneath.

    Also, it would be virtually impossible to glass the components together due to access once the liner is inserted.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Use West System 610 or a similar product. It's not cheap, but is handy for this type of application. Personally, I'd just use a pastry bag to fill my own cartridges, but many can't bring themselves to do this and a premixed/packaged product is what they want.

    With temperatures in NC being what they are, you'll want to do this at night, when it's considerably cooler, giving you more goo working time.
     
  5. Moreheadnc
    Joined: May 2008
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    Moreheadnc Junior Member

    Thanks Par but after looking that up[ you make a good point about temperature. I'll just thicken some epoxy when it cools off in October. With the rain we have been having EVERY SINGLE DAY it's going to take that long to get my paint done. Labor day next weekend, really no big hurry at this point.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    West System 209 is slow enough that even in 90 degree temperatures, you'll probably have enough time to get the liner back in. If you keep the epoxy in a thin film, until it's time to put in a bag or cartridge, you'll have over and hour to work with. If left in a cup or cartridge, then about 30 minutes at low 90's temperatures.
     
  7. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    Par- do you know what the builders are using when they drop in hull liners in current production sailboats?
    I have seen videos of a sprayed in goop approach which is used to bond components together.

    Here is the one find in a quick search:

    http://www.marineware.com/index.php...10:bonding-products&Itemid=110&layout=default

    Fits the bill but needs specialized gear... Maybe could be pot mixed for a smallish project?
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Production setups will use polyester or vinylester and as you've suspected, the equipment isn't very common, nor cheap. You'll be better off with one of the cartridge dispensed epoxies, for ease of use, lack of equipment purchases and related chemicals and/or accessories.

    I'd make up my own thickened goo applicator, but this requires some experience and familiarity, so the store bought stuff would likely work out best for you.
     
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