bolger super mouse?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jumpinjackflash, Jul 16, 2014.

  1. jumpinjackflash
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    jumpinjackflash Junior Member

    has anyone ever built one of these? what was the design intended for? would it be able to make a passage to the bahamas? across the atlantic? it reminds me a lot of the john welsford fafnir

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Russ Kaiser
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    Russ Kaiser Exuberant Amateur

    I hear that one of the main safety features of these little designs is even a mediocre swimmer can catch them if they go overboard; making safety lines superfluous :p

    Just kidding of course but you seem to be enamored with tackling blue water in something minimalistic like this. I would think this design was meant more for "sight of land" cruising (on the cheap).

    Having looked at sailboat ads for the past couple of months I can honestly claim that for the cost of building this you could get a "real" sailboat that while it still needs to be sailed within sight of land, will do it with more grace, style and speed. And if you take care of it you will likely get most of your money out of it when you want to trade (or give) up.
     
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    If you sent a hundred of them to cross the Atlantic, most of them wouldn't make it, so, yes it would be able to make a passage across the atlantic. To the Bahamas, I would bet half or more would make it, so, yes it's completely feasible to sail one to the Bahamas.
     
  4. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Remarkable people can do things that should not be possible. With luck.

    Most of us are not remarkable.

    But what do I know.
     
  5. Skyak
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    Skyak Senior Member

    Phil was a writer as much as a designer. You can read all about this design and what it is for. Spoiler alert! It's not for big water or bad weather.

    I think I told you this before but in small simple home built cruisers "paradox" is the design putting the most miles under the keel -several gulf stream crossings to the bahamas documented. If you have any intent of an ocean crossing in a sub 12ft boat forget all of the shelf designs and go directly to the 'shortest to cross the atlantic' record holders.
     
  6. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Super Mouse is a character boat that some dad might build for his kids to sail at the summer cottage on a small lake. Bolger was big on doing what he called "cartoons"of boats of that type and size. A Bolger Micro is another example along with Brick and a few more.

    Sam, the Mouse would be a suicidal choice for sailing to the Bahamas. Start at Fort Lauderdale and hope to get to Bimini or Cat Kay pass. Because the gulf stream current almost surely exceeds the hull speed of a boat like mouse, you'd need to aim toward a point 50 miles south of the lay line to Bimini. That means that you will be bucking the stream current at about 45 degrees. You might end up in Labrador rather than Bimini if the boat did not sink. A northeast wind will pile up seas that would bury that little boat in a New York instant. Been there.

    To the OP: raise your sights toward a much larger and more serviceable boat that my not be as cute but will be much less likely to drown you. If you must have a tiny little character boat then confine it to gently flowing rivers or small lakes.
     
  7. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    You are completely right, of course. I was being an ******* again, using sarcasm to convey my opinion that these "cartoon" boats are ridiculous abominations that wouldn't work for mixing cement as well as cement tubs would work as a boat. I was saying that if you tried doing much of anything with them , you'll probably die.
    Not that the odds are anywhere near in your favor of surviving, but theoretically...

    Kind of like "Yes, we have no bananas" or "That's right!! You're wrong!!"
     
  8. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Bolger used the cartoon description back in the dark ages when he was a regular contributor to the then popular magazine; Small Boat Journal. I don't think that he intended the word cartoon word as a negative assessment of his flights of fancy. He was often a comedian but his writings were also often intelligent and insightful. He seemed to revel in drawing out of the mainstream boats with plumb sides, blunt ends, and other odd features.

    I began to appreciate his seemingly bizarre design features when I chartered a Black Skimmer out of the Florida Keys. It was a sprit boomed yawl with lee boards that was perfect for the skinny waters of Florida Bay. It would actually sail in ten inches of water. On first discovering the flooded forepeak section I thought it absurd. Wrong! That was the cleverest thing since sliced bread when applied to a boat of that sort.

    Supermouse appears in Bolgers book; Boats With An Open Mind. It is 11'-6" x 6'-6" x 1'-3". A fatty that marches toward coracle dimensions. He specifically states in the descriptive text; " it works on small lakes and bays in gentle weather". That quotation should be sufficient information for the OP
     
  9. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    "A fatty that marches toward coracle dimensions." LOL That sounds about right, more or less reinventing the sequel to an inflated goat skin.

    In that vein, this also works on small lakes and bays in gentle weather...

    [​IMG]
     
  10. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    ^^:D

    I have seen those things at two different TSCA gatherings. To promote the minimalist concept, the sails are made of large, black, trash bags and the spars are broomsticks, some with the brush still attached.

    In the warped regions of my mind I can envision a group of those racing around a tiny three cornered course with IYRU rules suspended. Might be at least as much fun as the popular cardboard boat regattas.

    OOPs! derailed the thread. My bad.
     

  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you take the SuperMouse across the Atlantic, it'll take a minimum of a month, assuming you can keep the boat moving directly on course, at full speed, which of naturally you wouldn't be able to do. The real time crossing would be more akin to what Columbus experienced. Simply put, it's not enough to have a boat that can make the trip, but you have to eat, poop and drink along the way and this boat clearly doesn't have the capacity, for a 30 - 60 day passage. Assuming a 45 day trip, you'll need in the neighborhood of 360 pounds of water, just to drink, cook and bath. This says nothing of food stores or a place to put your poop.

    I mentioned in a previous thread, some books are in order JumpinJack. Additionally, some sailing experience is obviously necessary. For example, go find a buddy with an inflatable rubber raft. You know those cheap, Wal-Mart 6' things for kids to play with, in the local puddle. Now take this puppy and head down to the nearest beach on a large body of water, preferably ocean and set out with a paddle. After about a half hour, you should have a really good idea why you don't want a toy boat, in a big body of wet stuff. Lastly do yourself a favor and eat a big meal just before you take the rubber raft out in the big surf, as this is a lesson you'll need to learn too. Think of it as a protein shake to boost you up for a bunch of paddling.
     
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