Boat building help

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by lockley16, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    Hello guys/gals,

    I am new to this forum but I have been interested in building a small sailboat for awhile. I have a book called Boats To Go and I found a nice boat that I want to do from it. It is called the Tuckahoe 10. Does anyone know where to get plans for the little boat?

    Thanks,
    Lockley16
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  3. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    Thanks hoyt, I have seen the PD Racers before but I was never crazy about them, again I was more hooked on the Tuckahoe 10.
     
  4. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Thomas Firth Jones designed the boat. He, sadly, has expired. A Google search may yield some results.
     
  5. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    Man, that sucks that he passed. So is there anyway to draw plans? I would try to recreate the Tuckahoe 10 or something like it.
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  7. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    I was just going back to my book and I noticed I have part of the plans and I have pictures of the mold. I am good with scaling items so I probably draw up some complete plans.
     
  8. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    That sounds like a good idea. Lots of help on the forum if you have questions.
     
  9. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    I know this will sound stupid but they are things I need to know, like how do you make a mast and boom? And how do you take the boat from the mold to a real boat, do you cut the mold to make ribs?
     
  10. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Attached Files:

  11. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    Cool. Thanks for the link, I might try building a mast that way. I also found a boat called the Missile on svenson.com (I go to that site a lot) and the mast doesn't look that hard either, it almost looks easier. Granted this is for a 20' sailboat but I probably change it with 1x2's and 2x4's.
    Edit 11/1/13: Sorry guys for the pic, I new it was too big.
     
  12. lockley16
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 47
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: North Carolina

    lockley16 Junior Member

    One other thing, sorry for asking so many questions but I want to learn everything before I do it. What does the sheer, upper, lower, sheer, upper, and lower mean on offsets?
     
  13. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    You should build that mast scaled to fit your boat. It should do a very good job.

    Here is a homework assignment: http://www.glen-l.com/resources/glossary.html

    "SHEER (Sheer clamp)
    The junction of the side and deck or the member backing this junction. A boat with a "lot of sheer" is higher at the bow and stern than the center when viewed in profile; with little sheer, the sheer arc will be closer to a straight line (a hog sheer).

    OFFSETS
    Measurements supplied by a designer for the builder in order to lay down the lines of the hull. . . ."
     
  14. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,937
    Likes: 139, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    welcome to the forum Lockley,

    "shear" in boat building means the up turn of the gunwales (the uppermost stringer on the upper edge of the sides of the boats, where "guns" would be mounted on an old battle ship). the word shear is unrealted to the other uses of the word in English, in boat design it comes from the dutch language and just means "up turn". for examle many surf and river fishing boats have high up turned ends, one would say it has a lot of "shear", and some speed boats have negative shear or "hog back". The other uses of this word in English can mean "opposing force" as in a pair of shears, perpendicular, as in shear cliff, or translucent as in shear fabric. do not confuse these works, they come from old English, German and Latin and are unrelated (at one time they were all spelled differently).

    there are lots of odd terms in sailing and boat building, most are old english, but some have unknow oragin, some are dutch, some are french. You just have to learn them, there is often no rational reason for them (like why is he line that controls the sail called a "sheet"? no one knows for certain, just tradition).
     
    1 person likes this.

  15. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,402
    Likes: 194, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Also, sheer refers to steepness, whereas shear is more of a cutting action.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.