Bill Garden's Tlingit

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by rubenova, Jan 1, 2016.

  1. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    I came across a tiny picture of Tlingit. Does anyone have a larger (readable) copy of this and/or other magazine or newspaper articles?

    Thanks all
     

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  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Go to the top of this forum and click on "search this forum" and type in Tlingit and about 8 threads will come up. I don't have time to search each one but you may.....
     
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  4. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    Thanks for the leads, I checked them out. I was just wondering what the title "Tlingit proves there is still hope" means. Must be a good article, or a great hook. I can't for the life of me figure out where I found that little picture.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Not an especially practical craft, though it'll sip fuel and motor with grace, it still has only accommodations of a trailer sailor, yet pays slip fees only the Vanderbilts can tolerate.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Given Tlingit's low displacement a similar craft might benefit from Grumman sea-plane retracting gear (4) where a wench system is used to move to and from the water. This would be much simpler than an actual amphibian with powered wheels and be usable away from home where a marine railway wouldn't be.
     
  7. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    It is a boat that is interesting. To me it's like an old, exotic race car. Not very practical, but stunning good looks and the most speed with the modest power available. When you throw in the fuel economy that is claimed, with an antiquated engine (even by early 70's standards) I have to wonder what the same boat with a modern turbo-diesel and materials would be possible of. Could the hull shape alone be responsible for the performance? Is there a modern design that would outrun Tlingit's speed or economy with the same horsepower? I've even had ideas of a double sized aluminum version for quick passagemaking at an economical 10-12 knots! Thoughts?
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Double sized as in 100' + ? OK if you aren't paying per foot to house it ! But I'm not 100% it would give satisfaction as a very light boat slapping down on the flat bottom in head seas. And looking at the pics PAR posted, it would lie over at a crazy angle if beached.
     
  9. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    It would be a nice candidate for an outdrive in an updated version.
     
  10. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    On a trip around the world I wouldn't be very worried with moorage. Mostly a place to anchor out. A shallow draft would be beneficial for tucking in to little gunkholes. After circumnavigating, I would sell her off to the next adventurer to sail around the world again after me.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Do the calculations for fuel use and you'd see the range would not be up to circumnavigating the world, apart from all other considerations. Load up with fuel to run thousands of miles, and a vicious circle of overweight and increased fuel use sets in. Or maybe you are thinking of an all-coastal trip. I wonder if pirates could be avoided for all those tens of thousands of miles.
     
  12. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    I must admit that most the calculations needed are beyond my skill set. Maybe a triple size Tlingit? A vessel optimized for "short" runs under 3000 nautical miles might be able to hop from fuel stops on the way around might be more realistic for me. Really I'm looking at a giant "tent" with minimal accommodations and maximum tankage that moves along at a decent pace. I guess my main question is this. Does Tlingit have an under water hull shape that is extraordinary? And if it does or does not is there another hull shape that would travel 3000 nautical miles per fuel load at double digit speeds under power for a couple to go around the world?
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The boat achieves a high crusing speed because it is slender and light. It is like half a catamaran. The weight would need to be kept low or it would all go to hell. And the boat would be more effective with a radiused transition from side to bottom, but that would be a more difficult build.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A 180' version of this, would run smack dab into some physics issues. It would do best as a passagemaker, if it had a low aspect sailing rig, probably ketch, to extend it's range. Under sail it could easily run past LWL induced speed limits, so sailing at 12 MPH would be reasonable. It's just so little accommodations, for so much length, hard to justify ownership, without your own waterfront property it park it at.
     

  15. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    Ok. I'm going to narrow it down a bit. Keep in mind I'm still looking for a readable copy of the picture in the first post.
    Boat specs/capabilities
    1. 2000 nautical mile range at hull speed (square root of waterline x 1.34)
    2. 3000 nautical mile range at a slightly lower speed
    3. Tankage over accommodations. All I need is a comfy bed and a place to cook
    4. Shallow draft
    5. Simple/basic drivetrain. Preferably duplicated, side-by-side or...
    6. Ability to "heave to" and ride out a storm for a few days
    The boat should be able to cruise coastally between Alaska and South America or the Pacific Ring of Fire. At the same time the next owner should be able to go completely around the world with proper planning(short hops) or minimal modification. I'm thinking aluminum or maybe steel, but am open to other materials.
    What approximate minimum dimensions would be needed to accommodate the tankage? How big is too big to anchor off in various remote ports around the world? Might a Tlingit with smaller windows, larger tanks, and a modern drivetrain get anywhere close to this?
     
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