Best way to store plywood?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Corley, Apr 16, 2015.

  1. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    I'm gradually accumulating ply for a build and am curious as the best way to store the sheets. I seem to recall reading a post where it was suggested it was best to store flat with something between the bottom sheet and the floor? It will be some time till I start the construction could be up to a year or two.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can store it vertically, but it has to be well supported or it'll curl a bit.
     
  3. Builderjeff
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: florida

    Builderjeff Junior Member

    What type of wood are you using? http://plywood.boatbuildercentral.com/index.php
    Check it out. Marine plywood strongly increases the resale value of your boat.
    Marine plywood is stronger and has consistent mechanical properties: no voids.
    Marine plywood is much nicer and easier to work with.
    For small boats, quality 4 mm plywood is a good substitute for the 1/4" exterior ply often specified.
    Marine plywood (except for Fir) will not check. That feature may by itself pay for the difference in cost. To get a good finish with Fir or Pine, the hull will require extra fiber-glassing and large amounts of fairing compound. This is not necessary with Meranti or Okume. Always store in a flat dry area, avoid oils. good luck and good building!
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    So, you must be Joel's replacement.

    Plywood doesn't have to be stored flat and most folks can't afford the footprint of flat stacked plywood anyway.

    4 mm marine plywood is 33% thinner than 1/4" exterior plywood and though stiffer and stronger compared to a similar thickness, not a good substitute for 1/4", even if it is only 3 ply exterior grade.

    Meranti will check and the BS-6566 stock often has a really poor filler material employed, that tends to fall out under load or bending stress. It's certainly not as bad as Douglas fir sheets and can be handled with technique, but . . .

    Agreed, avoiding oils on your raw plywood stock is sound advice.
     
  5. snowbirder

    snowbirder Previous Member

    Right? That was a ridiculously commercial post. Love how the screen name tries to pretend it's a builder, vs a place selling you things.

    I'm sticking with Joel.

    http://www.gulfstreamcomposites.com
     
  6. Builderjeff
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: florida

    Builderjeff Junior Member

    Thank you PAR, I am simply trying to help forum members find the materiel and designs they need to build with. Admittedly Fiberglas fabrication, and paint is my expertise, and plywood handling not so much. PAR you are very smart, The footprint is to be considered. I personally keep my ply flat because space in no issue, but am now considering re-stacking my own pile!
     
  7. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    You could use pallet racking, or build a large bench that it slips under/into.
    Jeff.
     
  8. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    Corley epoxy coated

    the ply is 3mm gaboon marine bond plywood. From what I understand 3mm is not considered true marine ply due to the veneer thickness. From a space efficiency perspective in the workshop Storing vertically is appealing, can the bottom edge rest on a clean, dry concrete floor or is it better to put something in between? Is it best to clamp it upright between some sheets of 12mm ply or just clamp the sheets directly?
     
  9. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    wood against concrete tends to trap moisture at the interface from large temperate swings during day/night, particularly in very damp or humid environments.

    If it will not be stored too long, and you are in a dry climate, and no risk of spilled water on the floor, directly on concrete should not be a problem. If in doubt just throw some scarp pieces of wood on the floor where the edges of the plywood would other wise be in contact with the concrete. Concrete is not water proof (unless it was specifically formulated to be waterpoof), so if the ground under the floor is damp it tends to transpire through the concrete, anything on the surface tends to trap it there.
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I have a home made rack that allows me to store plywood vertically. It's slightly inclined, maybe 2 degrees, but likely less from plumb. It has wheels, which makes moving a few dozen sheets around pretty easy too.

    If the concrete is dry, sure you can place the edge on it, though this can be hard on the plywood. I've always used cribbing of some sort to lift the plywood off the floor, usually just a few hunks of 2x4, which also provides a place for lizards and other critters to hide from my dogs.
     
  11. Builderjeff
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Builderjeff Junior Member

    LOL my dogs as well are on the hunt, the lizards must be pretty tasty!
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. OrcaSea
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: Arlington, Wa

    OrcaSea Senior Member

    Spiders.

    That's all I have to say about that.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My dogs are equal opportunity hunters, though it takes quite few spiders to make a reasonable snack. Snakes, moles, birds, racoons, the usual fair, for anything foolish enough to wander into the yard.
     
  14. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    What about lost or wayward boat builders? :(
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    . . . tastes like chicken and if they're butthead(s), I'll provide the ketchup, though generally they'll treat most as ice-cream cones (their way of tenderizing the meat I think) . . .
     
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