Best Design For Liveaboard

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DavidWaters, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    Actually -- that was one of the options my wife and i looked at if we sold our house and buisness here but added a clause we would share the dock/mooring/ and a haulout spot to live aboard for the winters we didn't go south. I'd install a pellet burnig stove. In addition to this we would keep our motorsailer. These style of craft have alot of potential for liveaboards.
     
  2. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    That's what I had in mind when I said a houseboat. A Gibson, or the like (Gibson gets offended if you call them a houseboat. They call them yachts).

    A used Gibson or a Drift R Crus,
    [​IMG]

    or a used Cruise A Home

    [​IMG]

    would be ideal for the liveaboard who doesn't want to cruise a lot.
     
  3. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    David,

    Instead of the true houseboats that can't really take any seas at all take a look at a company called Bluewater Yachts. They have the same type of layout and price point, but I have had one out in 4' seas and while not comfortable didn't scare me either. And compared to the price of a Grand Banks 40 you could probably get a 60'.

    I think the smallest they made was around 50', which can be picked up on the used market for <75,000. http://bluewater.ep2.channelbladelive.com/Page.aspx/pageId/6472/Home.aspx
     
  4. DavidWaters
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Vancouver

    DavidWaters Junior Member

    Wow thanks for all the great replies and help,guys..especially West and eyschulman. I can't give points,can someone give them some for me? Thanks.

    Maybe I should have given more info-we can go up to $100k,maybe a bit more for the right boat and our dock is 45' long.We chose 40' because the price rises,and we'd rather have a newer smaller boat than an older larger one.

    West thanks for the extra hints,we had not really thought of aft cabins but saw one years ago that appelaed to us,it had glass going horizontally in the living area in a swoop-would you know.
    I do agree with the cruising thing, a trawler is of no use for us-even with our ocean capable sailboat there are many places on our coast we can't get to due to draft and slow speed-one place is in the videos you posted.
    18 knots tide,and just 15 minutes of slack!!

    Thanks to the rest as well-Stumble,we looked at the Bluewaters and they would fit the bill but the length is the problem.

    Houseboats would work,and I forgot to mention that the use we get is 2 weeks holidays-usually stay in one or two spots in the gulf islands and the odd long weekend to the local areas,which once again West thanks for the hint about getting gas engines.
    Although gas isn't the best,I'll look into it.

    Thanks again to all, though i won't have time to check in again for acouple days.

    Also West if you don't mind I'd like to see a picture of yours for ideas.
     
  5. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Sounds like a Meridian.

    I was going to mention the Bluewaters BTW but forgot..I kinda like them.

    We likely have crossed paths then-I've spent many years in the area,from childhood to now it's 30 years.


    I'm a kinda private person and don't put stuff out...but maybe. But I don't think others care enough to see my boat.


    Anyways you seem to like the aft cabin ideal,so....goto yachtworld.com and advanced search,plug in your requirements:


    These may work for you....

    Offer them $100k FOB Seattle:
    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1991/Silverton-Motor-Yacht-2326271/Winthrop/MA/United-States

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1999/Silverton-422-Motor-Yacht-2264233/Cataumet/MA/United-States

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1996/Sea-Ray-420-Aft-Cabin-2391571/Stillwater/MN/United-States

    Remember it's a buyers market out there...if it's a repo/bank owned unit-hit them hard.

    If ya have the cajones, the best liveaboard in the 44' range IMO is the Silverton 453 and try to find a repo at half price.

    I saw one for $115k (half price) about 15 months ago.
    http://sandiego.olx.com/pictures/2000-silverton-453-iid-262482132

    Anyways I have to go, I knew Sarah Burke a little and she died today :(:(:(
     
  6. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    WestVanHan,

    We bought a Bluewater 58' about 5 years ago and have loved it. True she is not a offshore boat, but the space available, the price, and the huge party deck are unparalleled in anything I have seen. And while defiantly not an offshore capable cruiser, for coastal cruising (for us New Orleans to Sarasota fl) it is more than adequate. And did I mention the price...

    David,

    With the dock limitations that does move the Bluewater out of you size range, but you might want to look at getting a longer dock. :p

    I was a little hesitant about the boat when we bought her, but she has really made a believer out of me. And compared to the square back power cruisers the price is much lower, with more living space. We also own a 45' Bertram, and used to have a 40 Hatteras, and I can tell you neither have near the comfort level of the Bluewater in the same size range.
     
  7. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    On the other hand, my friend bought a carver 28' for 5000 US. One engine was balky and that cost him a grand to fix. Boats can be had real cheap right now if you are somewhat handy and have some time to spend on it. Of course you still have figure on the maintenance budget no matter how cheap you buy it. My friend spends a good bit on a slip with a lift and general upkeep. Probably 10-13K a year.
     
  8. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    yes I looked at the Bluewaters and was tempted-what I really like was the props are in pockets,and the mpg even at speed.

    I was looking at a 680-690? with 454s..for $200k. I was going to ditch the 454's for Cummins 4Bts and be happy with 12 knots...and install a hot tub on the rear owner's deck.

    And rent out the top deck as a heli-pad :)

    But the length got me,and the 55' didn't have the space as I am limited to 55' in my dry storage and dock.

    So I went for:
     
  9. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    for.....?
     
  10. DavidWaters
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Vancouver

    DavidWaters Junior Member

    Hi guys and thanks again for all the replies.

    Looking back at my last post I said that houseboats would work,that is a misprint,they wouldn't work i don't think. We plan to go out and explore up the coast eventually.

    West: thanks for the ideas,we have been looking at pictures and as how you said many of the aft cabin boats are awkward looking and some are a lot sleeker.I think it was a Meridian that we saw.Some of boats you posted would definitely work for us with price and space.

    Any other ideas or about aft cabin boats you can share??

    Phil: thanks for the tip,however we'd be living on it so any renos would be very difficult,as we both also work too much.And we'd have to rent a place while paying others to do the work. Unless it was a really good bargain.

    I'm also wondering how you deal with the winter condensation on the much larger windows,we have had a sailboat with small windows and been fine with a dehumidifier and wiping the windows when needed.

    Thanks again.
     
  11. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    I urge you to get out and get onto as many different boats as you can.

    Condensation with the bigger windows: still run your dehumidifier,but make sure the shower(s) have exhaust fans...and run them well after you are done.
    If you don't have them,it's worth any hassle to install them IMO.Cooking also creates a lot of moisture- 98% of my cooking is done on the BBQ with a side burner,up on the back deck.
    Also get the window sealer plastic,you run double sided tape around the window frame (outside hopefully),put the plastic on and it heat shrinks with a hair dryer.Is invisible if done right,at Can. Tire.



    For myself,my SOR is privacy and a separated master cabin. Guests are up front,with their own head..and are required to clean it every day and at the end of any trip.They also clean and vacuum the staterooms-I am not a maid,and won't ask a girlfriend to clean up after guests.Form follows function for me,so this is what you get.

    If you want a sleeker traditional look with the main deck sole going out flat to the stern and aft deck,with an aft master cabin,you're looking at 60'+ and a lot of height

    Good luck,ask away if you have any more questions.
     
  12. DavidWaters
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Vancouver

    DavidWaters Junior Member

    Thanks for the winter tips,I never thought about the window plastic.

    In looking around we have found many deals in the US,hopefully importing one won't be too bad.
    We looked at some tug styled boats,too much and little room.
     
  13. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    You're thinking power..but how about an older sailing cat?
    A friend is looking around,I was on yachtworld and the Prouts have tons of room,and there are some French cats..Fontaine Pajot... in the 35'+ range from the 1990's that go for under $100k.
    If the width is not too much may be worth a look.

    The "tugs" like the Rangers are too small and American Tugs too much $$$$.
     
  14. DavidWaters
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Vancouver

    DavidWaters Junior Member

    Nice pic West :)

    Thanks for the ideas,we'll look into that based upon width of course.
     

  15. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    I ditched my sexy pic and put the boat up instead.

    Anyways you are welcome...one thing about cats that tics me off is the beds.

    An island berth,accessable from either side is the only way to go for me.

    Anything else where one has to climb over the other (ie ladies making night time runs,or myself getting up to check the lines) will wake the other up.
    Or the ones where you climb into the bed via the head or foot of the bed are better but still a PiTA.

    The only way to get island berths on a cat is for them to be near the front over the centre tunnel...sometimes over the rear area with accomodation boxes taking up deck space.

    Something to ponder..both of you crawl into bed and see how hard it is for the inside person to get out without disturbing the other.
     
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