Beau Geste-cracked-crew safe

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Doug Lord, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

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    Last edited: Jun 8, 2012
  2. sean9c
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    sean9c Senior Member

    There is a link at SA to a radio interview with Gavin Brady, skipper of BG.
    For clarification, the orientation of the crack, in the pic above, is athwartships across the deck, it then went down the topsides.
     
  3. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Far North Queensland, Australia

    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday all. Sean - yes - the crack was/is across the boat deck from port to stbd & yes it did continue down the hull side all the way to the keel.

    Like Doug said - bugger - that's scarry-stuff - big time. The senior at Cooksons - the building company - said both publicly & to Far Designs - that the laminate was not - substiantial enough - way back when Cooksons built the boat - since then it's broken a 'few' times.

    One thing is for sure - they'll get it all sorted out in the long run. One other thing is for sure - everyone will be better-off - c/w smarter/stronger/less breakable boats before we've seen the end of development - which this is just a small part of the overall picture.

    Good day to all - over there - while we freeze to death here in the tropics - it being only 9* c @ 0530, & that's a boooger for sure. Ciao, james
     
  4. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    You think so? I kind of doubt it in development classes. Somebody quoted Ben Lexcen in the S/A thread "If it doesn't break it's too heavy" and "If it breaks it is too light". Owners like to win, designers like to make owners happy and pushing designs to the breaking point is necessary to lower weight enough to be competitive. The moment longevity and durability enter the equation weight becomes a major issue.

    It is already perfectly possible to build safe, strong and long lasting yachts. They will not be as fast as those built to prioritise speed at the expense of a lower margin of safety. It may be worthwhile to think of it this way: Strong, Lightweight and Cheap - you get to pick only two of these goals in any project.

    I can't see huge advances to be made in material science until it becomes possible to cost effectively produce carbon nanotube structures.

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    CutOnce
     
  5. sean9c
    Joined: Jan 2011
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    sean9c Senior Member

    My nephew, who has a degree in composites engineering, just went to work for Zyvex Tech in their marine division working on the Piranha, be curious to hear what he has to say
     
  6. fng
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: new zealand

    fng Junior Member

    that the laminate was not - substiantial enough - way back when Cooksons ....
    'Mick' Cookson has said that about quite a few boats out of his yard, they haven't all broken yet ...
     
  7. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    I'd be really interested as well. Keep us posted.

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    CutOnce
     

  8. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

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