Beach launch compact fishing design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by IronPrice, Jul 17, 2017.

  1. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: NZ

    IronPrice Senior Member

    This is my first post on Boat-design. I'm from Nelson in New Zealand and I'm a keen fisherman.

    I'm trying to devise an ideal boat for launching/landing on rugged beaches for the purposes of going fishing/free-diving. I want to launch, cover a couple of miles fish and return. I need to be able to do this alone at times.

    My statement of requirements: -

    1) Light enough for one person to beach launch with the aid of some sort of wheels,
    2) Lots of bouyancy, self bailing and stable (surf),
    3) Powered by a ~25HP removable outboard (paddle or row if that fails),
    4) Room for rods, tackle, bait and fish,
    5) Durable or easily repairable materials,
    6) Trailerable,
    7) Able to cut through chop,
    8) Carry 1 or 2 larger adults e.g. 110kg each
    9) Minimum of 15 knots speed - faster than surf
    10) Quiet at rest/anchor,

    I don't expect much in the way of comfort or shelter. I would wear a kayaking drysuit or similar and of course a life-jacket.

    I'm open minded about materials and design. Any suggestion are welcome.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    No 4WD or other vehicle to get it to the water ?
     
  3. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    I have a 4WD which is an option at some sites but not most. It's very difficult on the steeper gravel beaches, people tend to use bulldozers as 4WD and tractors get bogged.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You will need a winch of some kind, and possibly inflatable rubber rollers, but difficult for one to manage.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Realistically, aluminium would be the obvious choice, meets the beach launch scenario best, especially with gravel. You don't need self-bailing, it is counter-productive in a small boat, raises the COG, adds weight.....You won't likely better an old Clark Abalone 14', bare boat under 150kg, 25 -30 hp is enough, exceptional seaworthiness for such a small craft. And should be cheap ! If they sent them to NZ .
     
  6. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    I have a winch (wireless controlled) on the front of the 4WD if I need it.

    I'm planning on making a beach dolly. I had one for a 12ft alloy dinghy with a 15HP outboard when I was a kid and I could manage that single handed.

    I don't mind detaching the outboard if I have to.
     
  7. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Alloy would be the most durable material, but the least DIY friendly. Good point about self-bailing, as long as there is sufficient bouyancy I won't need it! Clark Boats never came to NZ.

    The 14ft abalone looks like a lot more boat than I need. I'd like to keep the hull's dry weight under 100kg.

    I'm, half-wondering about slapping some sponsons with reverse chines on a 13ft outboard canoe?
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK, they were a trifle "wet", so might have been less successful over there. But I'd not be comfortable in anything much smaller. You can't go inflatable ?
     
  9. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Pure inflatable wouldn't last. An RIB or stabicraft would be feasible. The thing that strikes me about those boats is they have way more internal beam than I need. That's all dead weight. Hence my comment about an outboard canoe with sponsons.

    An outboard canoe has the dimensions I need but isn't stable enough. Slap on some sponsons that contact the water below planing speeds and ...
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    How bad is the shore dump, typically ?
     
  11. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Depends on launch site. Maybe 4 feet on a bad day at the worst spot. But big enough gaps to get out OK if you pick your moment.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What materials do you feel most comfortable to build with ?
     
  13. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    I would prefer to make prototype in plywood and then replicate best design with alloy.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Alloy seems inappropriate to me, you'd be better to buy one, you would find the weight getting away from you, without the advantages of pressings to add the stiffness. Otherwise getting the stiffness would require a lot of internal framing to kick your toes on. I'd suggest stringerless GRP sandwich, with two cross thwarts, and a clean uncluttered interior. I'd also suggest a well upswept sheerline forward to keep that shore dump out of the boat. You can epoxy on some sacrificial rub strips to avoid damage on the gravel.
     

  15. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    Location: NZ

    IronPrice Senior Member

    Glass could work.

    But I think alloy would be tougher.

    Maybe put layer of Kevlar on the hull if I go with glass?

    Thwarts sound good. Seating and structure in one.

    Upswept nose is good idea too.
     
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