B&B Minipaw Vs DinkyDink?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Travis T, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. Travis T
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Seattle

    Travis T New Member

    Looking to build my first dinghy as I've not been able to find one that fits the bill locally (tender to my San Juan 23). Unfortunately, budget is a concern. I wouldn't expect one design to have a big advantage over the other in this regard, but every little bit helps. I'm not really interested in doing an absolute pro quality build here, but don't want to be embarrassed by the little thing either. Will be aiming for a medium level of finish and lifespan in other words..

    B&B Minipaw or LewisBoatWorks' DinkyDink.
    Which would you choose and why?

    Catspaw | B&B Yacht Designs https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/sail/catspaw/

    DinkDink http://duckworksmagazine.com/14/designs/dinkydink/#.W-4yX-KIbIU

    Either design will be tweaked a little for nesting (probably)..

    I'm leaning toward DinkyDink for two reasons; The finer bow and overall more pleasing shape (to my very untrained eye) and the fact that the plans are free. I realize that there will be a small penalty in weight carrying ability if I opt for DinkyDink, but I'm not sure that it would actually present a problem for my use as it's just me and the dog at 165lbs and 45lbs respectively..
    I have yet to find any sort of build write up from someone using this plan.

    The main benefit of going with the minipaw are that there are a few good build write ups on the design and everyone seems to be pretty happy with the end result. Also, there is an increased load carrying capacity as well as support from B&B should I need it (Though I wouldn't expect to..).
    The plans currently cost $50.00...

    Any personal experience with either of these designs (especially dinkydink) would be hugely appreciated!!

    Armchair input is absolutely welcome as well of course..

    All the best,

    Travis
     
  2. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Capacity for minipaw looks to be a bit more. That pic shows 3 people loaded up comfortably with good freeboard remaining. I don't own either, but if I had to choose it would be that one too.

    Length restrictions aside, I do like the option of a dinghy sailor (with small mast & rig). If you're doing any snorkeling, scuba or just exploring around a sailing area they make nice auxiliary transportation...especially when you're a bit too tired to paddle back. Nothing beats popping a sail and letting the wind give you a free lift.
     
  3. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Back when I was interested in tenders, I did a bit of investigation that ended up with a chat with a guy who owned a big catamaran.
    He was down on the wharf, building a small sailing dinghy.
    He said that once he was anchored off some interesting islands, and he thought he would like to outboard over to the beach and spend some time looking around.

    The trouble was, there was quite a strong offshore breeze, and he know that if his motor failed, he would get blown out to sea with no chance of getting back to his boat. So he was building a sailing tender.

    I got quite keen on the nesting dinghies that take up less room on the mothership.

    So far, my favourite is Richard Woods DUO, it sails, rows and motors - and the option of having the tender become a Nesting Dinghy is just a middle size panel saw away.

    The two designs you are looking at are shorter, but tubbier, and wont motor or row as well. If you want to extend the usability of your yacht tender ( explore up rivers, handle surf off a beach etc) the extra length and bow fine-ness may be handy.

    This page has the best info I have come across. with plans at $AU30, it is good value.

    Duo https://www.duckworksbbs.com/product-p/woods-duo-id.htm
     
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  4. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    That's a nifty, multipurpose little dinghy. Good price on the plans too. A scaled down version would do the trick for boats with a narrower beam.
     
  5. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Richard's Duo is indeed good for a couple passengers.

    I would build it, but it is too small for me.
     
  6. cracked_ribs
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Vancouver and the Gulf Islands, BC

    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    I can't tell you much about the Minipaw (and nothing at all about the Dinkydink) but I did build a Catspaw 8 recently and it sails pretty well and I have taken it a long way from home.

    On messing-about forums I did a build thread if you want to see one go together.

    I do think that at this size range, performance differences are subtle and if you like a design and the supplier has a good track record, I'd say just follow your heart.
     
  7. Travis T
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Travis T New Member

    Thanks for the input so far. I would love to rig whichever design I end up with for sailing, but I don't know just how feasible it would be to sail
    a hull of such short length with any sort of efficiency. Would rigging a 6.5' pram for sailing be worth it? After playing with a sprit rig sailing dinghy,
    I feel like I would probably prefer a medium aspect bermudian rig with boom and a square top main. A little "high tech" for the application,
    but sure would be easy to handle. My preference would be for a daggerboard over a leeboard. I'd want some sort of composite mast for weight savings
    and the ability to break it down. Boom could potentially be the boathook playing dual purpose. Hmmm... Lot of extra work, but would make the little dinghy
    into a workable lifeboat (I'm doing a cruise down to the South Pacific this spring through summer) and there's some real value in that I suppose.

    A larger design would be great in every respect, but if the dinghy is going to go with me on my trip, it's gotta fit on the boat under the boom and it's a mighty
    cramped area. Add to that the fact that every pound of dinghy I bring aboard is a pound of stores I don't get to bring aboard and you'll start to understand more fully the need for my moderation in dinghy size. All this being said, I know an Achellis LT-2 is probably what I should set my mind to at this point, but they aren't exactly cheap and I had my last one for a whole two months before it got pinched while I was anchored out in front of Port Townsend. So I guess there's some residual emotions at play from that.. Plus, it really sort of sucked to use. The dinghy was great for what it was. I'm NOT knocking it. Great quality.
    BUT, it didn't row for anything and with it's big ole diameter tubes was incredibly cramped feeling even for being as small as it was.. All that said, I'll probably end up owning another one day just because it is what it is, you know? Anywho...

    NOW, PURELY FOR ENTERTAINMENT....

    LBW claims a useful load of 400lbs with DinkyDink. Loaded to .7 that amount gives 280lbs (which seems reasonable, I think..). 280 minus my weight gives 120lbs for water and stores. Let's say we devote 20lbs to highcal foods and take on 100lbs of water which gives roughly 12 gallons. Min indefinitely sustainable water intake seems to be around .4 gal per person per day so we'll go with that. Assuming a theoretical hull speed of 3.2 knots based on waterline length, let's say one was able to maintain 65% of that speed (right about 2 knots) for an average of 6 hours a day. Throw in a reliable min .5Nm current that one
    will use to one's advantage (not going to play the Essex game here...) and you're left with a 30 day supply of water and a somewhat conservative range of around
    720 miles. That is without any luck in gathering rainwater of course which can't be counted upon in many areas of the SP.. Once in the Marquesas, one could, in theory, island hop all the way to Aussieworld with that! If one was to make a decent canvas canopy and string some fenders into place along the sides for added stability you'd have a fine lifeboat indeed!

    Checkout this fellow's work with his Montgomery 6-8...

    [​IMG]

    Again, all that last bit is mostly for fun folks...
     
  8. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

  9. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Now you're thinking like a survivor. I would add a fishing rod and mini cooking stove to your emergency gear list. Recall the fellow who floated across the Pacific a few years back. He survived for months on catching fish, sea turtles and capturing sea birds. In my opinion, a life raft is potentially useless when your EPIRB batteries run out. An inflatable dinghy with a sail is the way to go. You definitely don't want to be arguing with Wilson on some remote island all by yourself.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Travis T
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Travis T New Member

    It seems that, in the end, the only thing one cannot do without at sea is a good volleyball. All other things can be improvised..

    Back to the dinghy now.

    I'm leaning ever further toward DinkyDink. I'm thinking that that DinkyDink has enough shape put into the ply panels when built
    that I could in good conscience go with 4mm Okume in lieu of 6mm. That would give a weight savings of up to 8lbs and a cost savings of $60. That would let me sheath the bottom and topsides in 6oz glass and still save about 4lbs. I suppose a small amount of weight isn't really that big a deal if I make the dinghy nest though. One only handles half the weight of the dinghy at a time in that way until you reach shore, at which point picking it up and carrying it or simply dragging it just doesn't present the same sort of problems as handling it on the boat.

    Assuming i was to build DinkyDink, would you try to use the cheaper, lighter 4mm okume or opt for the greater stiffness (and weight/price) of the 6mm ply?
    I see that the 6mm ply is 5 ply vs the 4mm's 3 ply.. Is that detail likely to play any sort of role in durability? For example, if the dinghy was to get rolled in some light surf?

    The difference in amount of shape is quite apparent here..

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    You could simplify further and have a sail if you went with the Dink vs DinkyDink. :D

     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2018
  12. Travis T
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Seattle

    Travis T New Member

    The Dink looks great. Wish I could go with something like that..

    Stopped by the local lumber place today and looked at the varying thicknesses of ply and wow, NO WAY am I going with 4mm!!
    6mm looks like bare minimum to my eye. Again though, as long as I make it nest, a little extra weight won't sink me..
     

  13. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

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