Australian boat windscreen

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by whitepointer23, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I need a new screen for the little pongrass i am working on . It is one those old style round windscreens that used to be on most old aussie boats. Is there any one in aus that sells them new or somewhere to get a new piece of perspex moulded to shape. I have to stick with the round screen because the deck is moulded for that sbape.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 482, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I recently had a similar issue and ended up using a car's windshield. It's heavier than the plastic ones, but it's also laminated glass which is easy to clean. I used a 1970 VW Karmann Ghia, which had a close enough shape. I had it cut down to fit at a local glass shop. I made a template to check windshields with and I tested it on many dozen, before settling on the VW.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Thats a good idea. Glass is so much better than perspex. How did you fix it to the deck.
     
  4. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 5,784
    Likes: 357, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2489
    Location: The Land of Lost Content

    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Plexiglass is easy to bend with the help of a heat gun. Make a simple plywood jig curved to shape and lay the straight plexi on it. Heat gradually with a heat gun until the plexi droops into its proper shape. Practice on scrap first to tune your talent. Be careful not to apply too much heat to an area to prevent bubbling.

    Is the old framing salvageable?
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 482, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've bent plexi with a heat gun, but it's not easy to get really compound shapes without an autoclave, particularly a windshield.

    My little runabout needed a well curved shape to look right. Originally it was captured in a wooden frame, but I didn't like the way it looked and the frame was done anyway, so I just saved the lower on deck piece. The windshield needed a substantial curve and I wanted some "return" on the outboard edges, for the new look, so I made a template. The new windshield was to sit in the deck mounted mahogany base, with it's existing groove, but it wouldn't have side uprights. Instead I laminated a huge curved brace along the top edge of the glass, that stretched from the side deck on one side, sweeping up to the windshield, around the top edge of the glass, then back down to the opposite side deck. I thought I might have to use metal to make this work, but two laminate attempts later, I got the 1/4" layers to take the curves. The glass is "captured" by a groove top and bottom, but the sides are unsupported, though I did radius the glass with a belt sander. The idea was to offer a more modern look, much like some of the late 60's Chris Craft runabouts, but in wood, instead of stainless tubing or aluminum extrusion. The grooves supporting the glass have a strip of rubber in them (the glass cutter's idea), which I just installed overhanging the edges of the groove, until the glass was seated. The rubber conformed to the groove and glass, then I trimmed the excess off with a razor. It looks like it always belonged there, which means it was a success.

    Metal is certainly an easier way to go, so if your boat can live with a metal frame, consider having one bent to suit.
     
  6. joz
    Joined: Jul 2002
    Posts: 166
    Likes: 0, Points: 16, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    joz Senior Member

    Try google seraching boat windows you will find plenty in OZ however failing that you could try your local Bunnings or Masters which stock perspex in various sizes, thickness and tints as well.
     
  7. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 121, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1404
    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    A note on bedding windshields. I have used a product called "Mortite", which is used on house windows as a temporary caulk (it's rope-like). After seven years of in-the-water for six months or more the plexiglass was replaced and while the caulk had never leaked, it was still like new and could easily be cleaned from surfaces. I am sure it or a similar product is available in Australia. Cheap!
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 482, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've been using this rubber (likely man made) stuff. It comes in 1/16" to 1/4" thick strips (on a roll), usually about 2" wide. It's soft, very pliable, conforms to "U" channel grooves well and for really odd shapes, can be heated to conform even more (boiling water for 10 minutes and it fit any shape). It'll drape around the glass and can be cut with a razor when all fitted. A little mild soap on the groove and it slides right in. Naturally, you'll want to match the groove/glass/rubber thickness so it'll fit with a wee bit of squish room. I learned of it from my glass cutting guy and they use it all the time for glass replacement. I'm not sure if it's available retail, as I just get a roll when I need one from them (a six pack can go a long way). Try "buttering up" your local glass cutter.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.