Are small ships a thing of the past?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by El_Guero, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

  2. latestarter
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    latestarter Senior Member

    By coincidence I was watching a programme on the Quest channel about the building of this ship last night.
    It was built in prefabricated sections as usual but half way through they flooded the dry dock, floated it out to let 2 smaller completed ships sail.
    I had not seen before how they made the double curvature plates for the bows.
    A man sits on a chair on a single curvature plate with a heating torch in one hand and a hose in the other, the alternate heating and cooling warps the steel.
     
  3. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Of course the idea is to eliminate smaller competitors, just like large fish eat small fish. Ship size always depends on the market, route, and shoreside transport. Ships will always grow to the maximum size permitted by technology for a under-fed market. For a market that can be satisified by a vessel smaller than maximum, the ship will grow to the most economical size. The concept that you want the maximum size ship is old...since the early 1600's every naval architect has known that.

    You need to take more ship design theory courses.
     
  5. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Very often also takes several men driving presses several hundred tons of power, 3D templates to shape the piece and some measuring instruments and, of course, great knowledge of the job.
    In general, attempting not to heat the plates.
     
  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Amazing coincidence ....
     
  7. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    I do. Don't we all? But what does design theory have to do with history of naval design theory? Shouldn't the class be titled 'history of naval architecture' instead of design theory?

    :D
     
  8. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    :rolleyes: If you don't know the "why" of designing a ship you definitely won't get the "how" correct.

    Leonardo da Vinci
     
  9. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Interesting stuff, had magnetic compasses in the age of Leonardo?. What navigational instruments used?.
    I know this has nothing to do with the thread but also the majority of posts in it.
     
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

  11. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    I'm pretty sure I was the last NA to specify a furnace plate at MINSY. I was fun to see the red hot plate dropped over the bucks and beat into shape. Then a couple of days with a grinder to get rid of the hammer marks. Here is the SSN 637 fairwater at the Keyport Underwater museum. The sail cap is made of a HY-80 furnaced plate, end caps of the fairwater planes also.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Ship size is about economics. Does the ship building industry get economics correct ?

    They built fast ships and now practice Slow steaming.

    Those big ships need big ports and loopsided trade.

    Chinese manufactured goods to the US for instance.

    How long will this economics work ?

    Most ships I see are moderate in size and service moderate size ports.

    Will the jumbos be profitable ?

    Mighty handy if the suez canal closes due to conflict.
     
  13. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    Most double curved steel plates are curved by rolling in one direction and "line heating" in the other, or by line heating in both directions (the process noted by Latestarter). There are a couple of articles on line heating on the web, most notably the definitive one by Lou Chirillo, that give extensive detailled instructions. It is a big topic in SNAME's "Journal of Ship Production".
     
  14. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Ah ... Leonardo ....

    Dreamed up tanks, helicopters, and all sorts of monstrosities he could not get the 'how' correct for ....

    :)

    Makes me wonder about his why sometimes.
     

  15. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    Jehardiman;

    You were at MINSY too? Never worked there, but I grew up in Vallejo, which is about half the reason I'm in this business.
     
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