apply polyester resin

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by gaffer, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. gaffer
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    gaffer Junior Member

    "I would like to apply fiberglass cloth to a plywood surface. I am on budget, so polyester resin is for me. But how do I apply polyester resin so it actually soaks into the wood."
     
  2. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Iroquois, Ontario

    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Brush or roller. Make sure if it's a roller it's a solvent compatible type or it'll fall apart. the cheapies at Lowes etc. won't hold up and you'll be picking foam out of your layup.
     
  3. tinhorn
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Massachusetts South Shore.

    tinhorn Senior Member

    I'm a brush guy. You can dribble it about, then spread it with a brush. I buy cheap "chip brushes" with wood handles at dollar stores.
     
  4. the1much
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    the1much hippie dreams

    ya,, cheap 2" chip brush,, then mix up resin, pour some in the middle of your ply,, and spread.,,wowz,, does this look BIG?
    you could even take a quick sanding with 80grit,, but dont go too deep.
     
  5. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    Lowes has the chip brushes in contractor bags for
    about 1/2 what they coat per each!
     
  6. Butch .H
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Butch .H Senior Member

    much I Gon Deaf:d
     
  7. gaffer
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    gaffer Junior Member

    Should I test your materials to see how well it going to work, if the poyerter resin will adhere to the wood, if it'll soak through, etc.
     
  8. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Why not too deep?
     
  9. the1much
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    the1much hippie dreams

    cause ply is made of "ply's" hehe,,,and is seperated by the glue..so "in theory" the resin is only go as deep as that first "ply",, so say each "ply" is 1/4" thick (#'s are for the ease) and you sand 1/8" down,,,, you'll only have 1/8" of penetration.
     
  10. KnottyBuoyz
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    It never hurts to test your materials first especially if you've never done anyting like this before.
     
  11. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    the resin wont "soak through" it will only go into the ply as far as the first ply,,and when using poly,you should first cut your wood and pre-drill any holes,, then put 2 coats (3 is better) of resin on,, then the next day take 36( beginners should use 80grit) grit and go over everything ( carefully,,your just "scratching it up to bond),, then put your glass on.and in all practicality,, after your first 2 coats,, the next day go back and get any "dry" spots where the resin soaked in more.
    and like Knottyz says,,, if you can,, you should ALWAYS test things first,, specially since EVERY area makes all the "mixes" and "times" different according to your environment.,,, SPECIALLY taking advise from people like me,,, hehe ;)
     
  12. TollyWally
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    TollyWally Senior Member

    "EVERY area makes all the "mixes" and "times" different according to your environment.,,, SPECIALLY taking advise from people like me,,, hehe "

    LOL, now that's a tricky environment!
     
  13. gaffer
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    gaffer Junior Member

    environment my work shop

    No problem with the environment my work shop as a good environment
    Thanks for all the advise from people like yourself ,,, hehe " I hope my
    "mixes" will be the same, time after, time after time, etc, etc.
     
  14. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    the1much hippie dreams

    what i mean by enviro. is humidity, heat,dew point,temps, sunlight hours.
     

  15. Meanz Beanz
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Meanz Beanz Boom Doom Gloom Boom

    Ya OK... I get that but I would have gone a quick 40 grit... 80 seemed a bit tame... tis all.
     
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