Anyone want to help?

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by ted655, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

    This idea was put out there by another & didn't get much interest. It (at first) did seem foolish. The more I think on it I see some merit. It's not "yar" nor "bristol" & Loyds certainly won't touch it but there are many who would build it & enjoy using it.
    A 'hillbilly houseboat" Cheap to build, safe to float and ugly as sin. Since this a serious design forum, this is not a friolis proposal. I don't expect many will give it credibility as a valid request. IF anyone has a spare moment, I would appreciate their "design" comments, because I already know it's out of the box thinking. I present some ideas I have to get it going BUT they are not set in stone.
    I purpose....."The Cargo Container Houseboat" for sheltered waters. (STEEL)
    1. 8 X 40 standard shipping container (plentiful & cheap), set on a simple hull form.
    2. Concrete ballast keel. Flat. Boxed with 6" I-beams (re-enforcind bars & wire mesh within depth of beams & filled in)
    3. 5 or 6' W X 8'L' hull plate set at 45 degree angle, welded to top edge of I-beam. (this angle allows for 45 deg gussets) a thrift of materials issue.
    4.2' straight vertical sides. (btm & sides tied together with stringers, cross members, etc..)
    5. simple scow bow.
    6. simple stern suitable for inboard W. sterntube/rudder propulsion

    All ideas should adhere to thrift of material shapes. ie; getting the most out of a sheet, a standard length, or off the rack material, with as little "end" waste as possible. sizes must be managible for simple devices (A-feame on truck bumpers, etc.) and 2-3 person fitting.
    The "boat" should (as far as possible) be simple for persons with average skills to build ..Dimentions shoul reflect the use of sizes of steel that a mill considers "standard stock" This keeps cutting/grinding to a minimum. It also avoids special "cut" charges from adding to cost. It also allows for scrounging & salvage of materials.
    Primaraly we are interested in the "float away" stage. The end result should allow for "off the shelf" fitting out.
    The boat (oh allright...craft) should be safe, simple, shoul draft & easy to drive. It should have ample tankage and living space for extended stays or large family use.

    Just thought I'd ask. Thanks, Ted
     
  2. SeaPhantom
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    SeaPhantom Junior Member

    Aluminium containers also widely available. Coat with epoxy.
     
  3. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Why not?
    Containers are plentiful and strong. Barges are simple and cheap. Concrete makes great ballast. Not an ocean crosser, but quite feasible I think!
     
  4. SeaPhantom
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    SeaPhantom Junior Member

    Containers Make Great Boat building Hangers too

    Hurricane Charlie Damage and roof repair photos 035.jpg This just happened to be photographed during one of my six huricane knockdowns! But this is where I built the SeaPhantom monster www.seaphantom.com. Knew I couldn't simultaneously afford a big shop, and $6,000 rolls of carbon fiber, so I designed this hanger from shipping containers to set down in a parking lot! Fiberglass arches, layed-up over pvc pipe, w/heat shrink plastic over. After six knockdowns, Latter redesigned the whole thing as a tension structure, Wilma came through, 130mph winds, and didn't do a thing to my plastic hanger- But 25 yards away, PUNCHED out a 'hurricane-proof' steel door , and blew out 20' of welds!! But the plastic hanger made it!!!
    [/ATTACH]
    photo shows earlier two-passenger prototype plug under construction
    Friends Dubbed this: 'Area 52'
     
  5. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

    I keep rethinking the shape of the hull. The end result needs to have a beam wide enough to allow the 8' width of the container plus suitable side deck widths (18" ?).Add to this requirement 2 more "musts". One is, the shape must remain as flat as possible for shallow draft. The third requirement is the underwater seams shoul be held to as few as possible. A Mississippi riverboat shape, but few seams & no bending. This I could use some help on. The hull needs to be built from ground up, then position the container placed on (in) it. The sides& decks could then be welded into the sides of the container, unifying the craft. Object being to not pay for crane charges untill final load onto a transport truck.
    My idea is to weld the I-beams (2' wide X 36' long) for the keel & pour the concrete between I-beams. The keel will set on OSB sheets which set on support blocking. Sheets & blodking are removed later & keel rests on ground for final build. Then start welding the hull plates along the keel shape.
    A container weighs 9,000#. I estimate a frame of 6" I-beam & renforceings filled with concrete to be a ballast weight of around 6,200#. Is this enough ballast for a 40 X8 X8 box shape?
    ,
    I would like to know more about the PVC/fiberglass trusses used on the hanger. Good luck with sea trails phantom.
     
  6. SeaPhantom
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    SeaPhantom Junior Member

    Just join two boxes together; forget the ballast and 'hull' shaping. Just build a floating hillbilly mansion- by the time you form hulls, side decks, and figure ballast, you might as well just start from scratch and build a purpose-design boat. You could add a quickie barge type 'bow' if you really needed to go places (slowly). Aluminium boxes are lighter, cut easier, and will float higher for cutting-in windows etc.

    Hanger arches were formed from a bundle of 1" diameter pvc pipes, pre-cambered into desired arch, then wraped three sides @ time in roving and resin(turned over for other side) as they sat. Finished w/ gelcoat. bases fabricated, then bolted to top edges of containers. Longitudnal 'stringers' added before heat-shrink plastic went over. Later, tensioned wire cables added to stiffen against hurricanes. Gutter panels went up on container edges to keep water from pouring in on shop.
     
  7. Redsky
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Redsky Senior Member

    if it was me and i was building a house, barge....take 3 45' waffle side steel containers , join together fair the sides and bottom with marine plywood form a angle bow with sheet ply and some angle iron and a aft transom with a surface drive ..install 2 bulkheads in each container plus one long one across the doors area so you end up with 13 compartments the bow 9 body and 3 aft/transom thats your hull...a bow thruster would be of exceptional help i think build house on top deck. 20x40... gives you 24" down each side and 30" front and back walk around depending on how mutch bow and tail you give her 25 x50-60...affix ply with lap joins and galvinised carriage bolts epoxy the seams while your hanging then epoxy paint the ply with couple of coats dunno whether you want the expence of a fiberglass layer,,i wouldent bother myself its just a barge after all. before fairing with ply and joining the containers id probably spray them with a basement waterproofing product like they use on outside of basement walls
     
  8. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Pick up an old travel trailer (pull type, not 5th wheel), build a scow hull and marry the 2...simple and cheap and already equipped.

    Steve
     
  9. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

  10. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

    Some of these ideas (while doable), don't meet the critera. A box without ballast is a coffin. Again, the idea is a crusing houseboat. The size has to be able to allow for traveling and manuvering withour tugboats.
    I have seen steel barges that were built for teavel trailers. Travel trailers are not really built very well. A life on the water would be a short, leaky existence. However, as they came apart, you could pull them off & roll another cheapie back on.
    As far as "purpose" built, you may be right. What I'm interested in is a shortcut of sorts. Something for less skilled, equipted, bankrolled builders. Many of "us" don't have a building in which a purpose built boat can be built. Nor the time or skill to weld together enough pieces to end up with anything close to a boat with smooth clean lines. The resulting attemp causes many builders to abandon the project. A simple hull with a minimum of welds below the waterline (maybe hired out to a professional), AND fastened to a existing cabin, will get people floating. A big incentive to finish (to their tastes and abilitys) the project. A shipping container boat well done is far better than a purpose built yacht poorly done.
    1 container (affordable steel-used), single width, ballasted hull, economicaly powered, with as few welded seams underwater. Still the criteria.Thanks everyone.
     
  11. SeaSpark
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    SeaSpark -

    Steel tubes.

    For a design like this i'd go for a catamaran with large diameter steel tubes for hulls.
    Easy to build and save on fuel costs later.
     
  12. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    ted655 Senior Member

    Sounds good. A container weighs around 10K. Add another 10K for cargo & equipment. Another 5K for ballast. At 25K for 1/2 pontoon submergen, each 'toon has to support 25K.
    Can you link me with a sourse of 'toon this size?
    The builder this design is for can't build them. They will need to be purched & shipped at a price comprible to materials found in their area. The pontoons I've researched, either don't have the bouyancy required OR they are too costly.
    I have seen pictures of such a project being built by a couple in Brazil (less the Container box). I was unable to find that size lightweight pipe here in the USA.
    It will be great if you've found it! Send me the link. Thanks
    As this "box" is SO high profile, do you have an idea of how to ballast a catamaran hull?
     
  13. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Is there any reason you want to make this boat "ugly as sin"? One of the things I learned as a shipwright's apprentice is that ugly boats are harder to build. Materials bend in harmonious shapes unless you fight them.
     
  14. ted655
    Joined: May 2003
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    Location: Butte La Rose, LA.

    ted655 Senior Member

    No, not at all. I was just getting ahead of the purists that want clean lines. Obviously this boat is not going to look areonodynamic. By the cryteria of being built with off the rack materials, with not much more than a buzz box welding machine & a light duty cutting totch, this design won't have rolled plates or laser cut pcs.Skills vary, and some will adapt their own tricks to create truly awesome boats. What I want help with is a safe, simple hull that will give basic satisfying outcome for the less able builsers.
    Maybe "plain jane is a better term, OR KISS. Like I said, a well made simple container boat will gender more respect than a bad attempt at a sleek yacht.
     

  15. Redsky
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Redsky Senior Member

    my instincts say that in oorder to ballast a Single! container properly you would just about have to sink it to a draft of 5'-6'..and even then it would be a rolly polly thing i think....minmium 2 containers side by side for stability would be my specification...maby slice 1 container laid on its side and fit a wood deck on top? and build on that? and at that you could orgami it and slice 3 sides and lay it open
     
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