Antifouling for Box Cooler

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by marufuddin0, Nov 4, 2020.

  1. marufuddin0
    Joined: Feb 2016
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    marufuddin0 Naval Architect

    Hi,

    We would like to install a box cooler on our ship. However, I was thinking about a few practical issues. The inlet slots at the bottom and outlet slots at the side shell might get clogged by snails, polythene, checksheet, small fishes. So, I am worried that the natural water circulation might stop and prevent the engine from running.

    However, I see many ships have installed these types of box cooler. Could you please tell me what is the actual scenario? Does it really get clogged by snails, fouling despite the cathodic system?
    How to do maintenance for such things in terms of real situation?

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  2. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    It’s important that the top of the box be above the waterline, so that the tube bundle can be removed for cleaning without sinking the ship.
     
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  3. marufuddin0
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    marufuddin0 Naval Architect

    Do the openings (inlet and outlet) of the shell get clogged by snails?
     
  4. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    Not if you clean them as needed!
    The important thing is to be able to do that, Because you can’t control Nature.
     
  5. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    While the edges of the openings will lose paint faster due to flow, a properly applied anti-foul coating and and zincs will protect the shell. It's the tube bundle that I would worry about fouling; that is a warm low flow area that is just a critter magnet.
     
  6. baeckmo
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    baeckmo Hydrodynamics

    Yup, but often copper or a copper based alloy; not so attractive to the critter larvae.
     
  7. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    You'd be surprised, as was the US Navy when it reconstituted the 5th Fleet in SWA. It isn't that the copper doesn't kill the bio-fouling in direct contact ..eventually..., but that the bio-fouling builds up a layer of deposits that isolates the new growth from the tubes toxic metals.
     

  8. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    If the hull is steel, you can weld half pipes along the outside of hull lengthwise In lieu of a cooling tube bundle.
    That’ll be easier to keep clean, and is a very effective cooler.
    I’ve even seen that done on the inside of the hull.
     
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