Am I getting myself in too deep? jet/drift boat

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by sbeausol, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. sbeausol
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: NH

    sbeausol Junior Member

    I am hoping to build a boat based off of montanaboatbuilders.com kodiak jetboat. It looks like a pretty unique design. I've contacted them and they have plans/kits they can get me, but there is one part of the design that incorporates a 3/4" honeycomb polypro bottom sheathed in kevlar and the outside lined with Linex. This is used instead of 1/2" plywood for the bottom. The boat is rated for a 40hp jet and used for running in skinny water. I am a total newbie and this would be a hobbie type build, although I certainly will give it the time it needs. Am I getting out of my league trying to hand layup the kevlar/honeycomb bottom? I could have them do it with an extra shipping charge, or possibly to outsource the kevlar lamination?

    any thoughts are appreciated...
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Consider building it out of wood and lining the whole bottom in dynel which lays up like fiberglass. Wood Lasts Generations.
     
  3. robherc
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    If you use Dynel, you HAVE TO use some form of pressure lamination...vaccuum bagging/VIP is HIGHLY recommended.


    ...just my $0.02 worth, take it or leave it.
     
  4. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    He did not mention the size of the boat I believe. So a hard rubber roller on a somewhat flat bottom should push the epoxy to saturation of the biaxyle weave to close to 100%. then put an extra 8" tape from the stem to the transom and he can drive it through gravel. thats my 2 bits. It is tough stuff.
     
  5. robherc
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    @rasor:

    I agree, it IS tough stuff...but the mfgrs & distributors recommend pressure-laminating because it has a nasty habit of absorbing resin and swelling in the laminate otherwise (and that equals more cost, and more weight...2 big strikes).
     
  6. sbeausol
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: NH

    sbeausol Junior Member

    sorry guys, the boat is 15' in length. The plans call for kevlar on the inside and lineX on the outside. Since i've never done a hand layup, my biggest concern is that the level of difficulty goes up dramatically.

    The basic process is, place tack coat of epoxy, then kevlar, flow coat the kevlar, then fiberglass, cover with expoxy, weigh the joints and pray until morning. This seems doable for an amateur?

    For the outer coat, the builder recommended lineX, how does that compare with dynel?

    thanks again?
     

  7. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    It just sounds like white water rocks and a lot of abuse. I wouldn't any more "hightec" than wood, biax and epoxy.. plywood even better.. Anyway if that's not racing??
    Anyone needing a jet/engine package? got one SeaDoo remains :p
     
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